Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad
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  • Friends Meeting House
  • Hello, we are hoping that you know somewhere we can stay at. 'Moses' told us you knew
  • Please tell us I'm so tired!
  • Stop crying! You can stay here.
  • Dr Richard Eells House
  • Ok but i hope we arent wasting time
  • Will we get caught through the 'gospel train' method?
  • I don't know but you'll have to be sneaky. Take a break here.
  •        Dr Nathan Thomas House 
  • Sir, How close are we to 'heaven'?
  • Yes please. Thank you
  • i'm not sure but you and your friend can stay here.
  • The Friends Meeting House was constructed between 1815 and 1817. It was in use through the first half of the 19th century. It was located in Delaware on 401 West Street.
  • Bethel AME Church
  • Can you let us stay here and keep reminding  us through the night?
  • Oh no! I've forgotten what process we need to do
  • You shall follow the 'Drinking Gourd' in order to get there. Stay here for a while
  • Dr Richard Eells' House was a station across the border of Missouri. In 1842 he was caught helping a slave escape. He was then arrested. His house still stands in Illinois on 415 Jersey street
  • Levi Coffin House
  • Don't be so hard on them though.
  • Somewhere around 2,000 sir.
  • Dr Nathan's House was one of Michigan's most active Underground Railroad participant. Between 1840 and 1860, he helped about 1,000 to 1,500 fugitive slaves escape. This house is now located in Michigan on 613 East Cass Street.
  • John P. Parker House
  • UNDERSTOOD SIR
  • JUST KEEP RUNNING! WE ARE ALMOST TO THE 'PROMISE LAND'!
  • This church became a anti-slavery movement, often keeping fugitive slaves on their way to Canada. Their encouragement of the abolitionist movement and their activities in the Underground Railroad were not responded to too well by some members of the local community
  • The Levi Coffin House was a part of the legendary Underground Railroad for fleeing slaves. More than 2,000 fugitive slaves were guided to freedom with this house
  • So about how many 'Flying Bondsmen' shall I expect?
  • John was a freed slave who bought his own freedom. He helped hundreds of slaves escape at Ripley in Brown County as a conductor.
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