Of Mice and Men

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  • I wish I had someone to talk to...
  • "I was just supposin',"
  • "This ain't true. George ain't got hurt."
  • Crooks' bunk was a long box filled with straw, on which his blankets were flung. On the wall by the window there were pegs on which hung broken harness in process of being mended; strips of new leather; and under the window itself a little bench for leather-working tools, curved knives and needles and balls of linen thread, and a small hand riveter. On pegs were also pieces of harness, a split collar with the horsehair stuffing sticking out, a broken hame, and a trace chain with its leather covering split.
  • "A guy can talk to you an' be sure you won't go blabbin'. Couple of weeks an' them pups'll be all right."
  • "How long you think it'll be before them pups will be old enough to pet?"
  • "Crooks sat on his bunk. His shirt was out of his jeans in back. In one hand he held a bottle of liniment, and with the other he rubbed his spine. Now and then he poured a few drops of the liniment into his pink-palmed hand and reached up under his shirt to rub again. He flexed his muscles against his back and shivered.
  • "We're gonna have rabbits an' a berry patch."
  • "I said s'pose George went into town tonight and you never heard of him no more." Crooks pressed forward some kind of private victory. "Just s'pose that," he repeated. "He won't do it," Lennie cried. "George wouldn't do nothing like that. I been with George a long a time. He'll come back tonight-" But the doubt was too much for him. "Don't you think he will?" Crooks' face lighted with pleasure in his torture.
  • "Come on in. If ever'body's comin' in, you might just as well."
  • "I was born right here in California. My old man had a chicken ranch, 'bout ten acres. The white kids come to play at our place, an' sometimes I went to play with them, and some of them was pretty nice. My ol' man didn't like that. I never knew till long later why he didn't like that. But I know now." He hesitated, and when he spoke again his voice was softer. "There wasn't another colored family for miles around.
  • "What rabbits?" "We're gonna have rabbits an' a berry patch." "You're nuts." "We are too. You ast George." "You're nuts." Crooks was scornful. "I seen hunderds of men come by on the road an' on the ranches, with their bindles on their back an' that same damn thing in their heads. Hunderds of them. They come, an' they quit an' go on; an' every damn one of 'em's got a little piece of land in his head.
  • Ever'body wants a little piece of lan'. I read plenty of books out here. Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land. It's just in their head. They're all the time talkin' about it, but it's jus' in their head.
  • Candy came in, but he was still embarrassed, "You got a nice cozy little place in here," he said to Crooks. "Must be nice to have a room all to yourself this way." "Sure," said Crooks. "And a manure pile under the window. Sure, it's swell." Lennie broke in, "You said about them rabbits." Candy leaned against the wall beside the broken collar while he scratched the wrist stump. "I been here a long time," he said. "An' Crooks been here a long time. This's the first time I ever been in his room." Crooks said darkly, "Guys don't come into a colored man's room very much. Nobody been here but Slim. Slim an' the boss."
  • You said about them rabbits
  • Candy came in, but he was still embarrassed
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