Loftus and Palmer 1974

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psychology homework

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  • Experiment 1- procedure
  • Questionnaire
  • Smashed
  • How fast were the cars going when they hit each other?
  • Collided
  • Contacted
  • Bumped
  • Findings
  • Average Speed With Each Verb. • Smashed- 40.8 mph • Collided- 39.3 mph • Bumped- 38.1 mph • Hit- 34.0 mph • Contacted- 31.8 mph
  • 45 students were shown 7 films of different road accidents.
  • Experiment 2- procedure
  • They were then asked 'how fast was the car going when they hit each other?' They were split into 5 groups and one group had the word 'hit' but the other groups had either 'smashed, collidied, bumped or contacted'.
  • Questionnaire
  • 1. Did you see any broken glass? 2. ----------------------- 3. ---------------------- 4. ---------------------- 5. ---------------------- 6. ---------------------- 7. ---------------------- 8. ---------------------- 9. ---------------------- 10. ---------------------
  • 1 week later
  • We had to come back 1 week on to answer 10 questions about the video.
  • The results are shown above and therefore demonstrate that leading questions affect the response given by eye witnesses.
  • Findings
  • • Smashed- 16 people YES, 34 people NO •Hit- 7 people YES, 43 people NO • Control- 6 people YES, 44 people NO
  • Did you see any broken glass after the cars hit/smashed each other?
  • A set of participants were divided into 3 groups and each shown a video of a car accident lasting 1 min.
  • They were then asked to return 1 week later and were asked a series of 10 questions about the accident including 'did you see any broken glass?' There wasn't any broken glass but those who thought the car was going faster there would be glass.
  • Loftus and Palmer found that found that leading questions do change the actual memory a participant had for the event.
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