Texas Revolution

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  • Texas Migration
  • New Dictator of Mexico
  • Battle of Gonzales
  • Come and Take It
  • When Mexico won its freedom from Spain they needed people to settle into their territory, so they invited the Americans.  When Americans came over, Mexico expected them to become Catholic and learn Spanish but never did
  • Remember the Alamo
  • Santa Anna believed that he was greater than the Mexican Constitution and overthrew it and named himself dictator. He created the theory that the "American" Texans would use his arising to power as an excuse to secede. After that he tried to disarm all Texans when he thought it was necessary.
  • Battle of San Jacinto
  • At the battle of Gonzales a group of 18 men who were in the village at the time stood up against a small part of the Mexican army. As the Texans were getting into position, the Mexicans fired onto the Texans injuring one person. At that the Texans fired the spiked cannon and sent the Mexicans back all the way to San Antonio.
  • Adoption of The Texas Rebublic
  • The Alamo was the first major defeat of the Texas Revolution. It was also a call to other Texans telling them to prepare for war against Mexico. In every other battle Texans would cry "Remember the Alamo!"
  • The Battle of San Jacinto only lasted 20 minutes and in that time 800 Texans defeated 1,500 Mexican soldiers.  Out of all the prisoners captured one of them was the dictator Santa Ana, who in exchange for his freedom, signed a peace treaty declaring that Texas was an individual republic. 
  • Texas was added to the Union in 1845 as a slave state. When this occurred it sparked the Mexican-American War involving the topic of Slavery.
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