A Cap for Steve: The Negotiation

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Storyboard Description

Dave Negotiates a price for Steve's Cap with a wealthy parent.

Storyboard Text

  • So it is.
  • What's this about that cap? The way kids can get excited about a cap. Well, it's understandable, isn't it?
  • Sit down, Mr. Diamond.
  • I don't doubt it, but no kid can sell something that doesn't belong to him. You know that's a fact Mr. Hudson.
  • Well, Mr. Diamond, from what I gathered from my boy, you're able to prove this cap belonged to your boy.
  • That's a fact
  • Mr. Diamond, you'll have to believe my boy bought that cap from some kid in good faith.
  • Sure it does. But supposing we called in a policeman. You know what he'd say? He'd ask you if you were willing to pay my boy what he paid for the cap. That's usually the way it works out.
  • It means a lot to my boy, too, Mr. Hudson.
  • Yes, that's a fact, but the cap means a lot to my boy, Mr. Diamond.
  • Dave and Steve enter Mr. Hudson's home. Mr. Hudson addresses Dave in a very affable and polite manner. Dave feels quite uncomfortable and intimidated by Mr. Hudson's luxurious home.
  • But that's not right. It's not justice. Not when it's my boy's cap.
  • Two Dollars!
  • All right. What did you say your boy paid for the cap?
  • I know it isn't right. But that's what they do.
  • Two Dollars.
  • Dave takes Steve's arm and sits him down beside him on the couch. Mr. Hudson's son watches his father. Steve looks up at Dave, and avoids looking at either Mr. Hudson, or Mr. Hudson's Son.
  • I'll tell you what I'll do. I'll give you ten dollars. The cap has sentimental value for my boy, a Philly cap, a big-leaguer's cap. It's only worth about a buck and a half really.
  • I'll give you the two dollars.
  • I suppose that's fair enough. A cap like this can be worth a lot to a kid. You know how it is. Your boy might want to sell - I mean be satisfied. Would he take five dollars for it?
  • Five dollars? Is it worth Five dollars, Steve? No thanks Mr. Hudson.
  • Dave and Mr. Hudson continue to discuss Steve's cap. Dave becomes more and more frustrated as the conversation turns from a discussion into an argument.
  • What do you say, Steve?
  • I don't know.
  • I'll tell you What l'll do. This cap - well, it's worth as much as a day at the circus to my boy. Your boy should be recompensed. I want to be fair. Here's twenty dollars.
  • Dave becomes more and more upset as Mr. Hudson uses Dave's lack of wealth, and his own wealthy status to keep the hat in his sons possession. Mr. Hudson maintains his kindly demeanor, but his eyes become more shrewd and calculating.
  • Dave sees a look of dependence in Steve's eyes. He then grows angry and reckless, as he feels he has no choice but to meet the demands of Mr. Hudson. Steve grins brightly at the Hudson boy one Dave agrees to pay for the hat.
  • Dave's eyes brighten at Mr. Hudson's final offer. Steve is in a trance when Dave asks him if he'll accept Mr. Hudson's offer. Mr. Hudson places the money in Steve's hands, taking his bewilderment as an acceptance.
  • Well, here you are. It's a lot of money. But I guess you had a right to expect as much.
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