Julius Caesar

  Copy


More Options: Make a Folding Card




Storyboard Description

This storyboard does not have a description.

Storyboard Text

  • exposition
  • conflict
  • rising action
  • In the exposition, Caesar is coming back from defeating Pompey and the towns people celebrate the victory of Rome. Two men named Flavius and Marullus did not like the celebration of Caesar becaue he killed Pompey and his sons and argue with the townspeople.
  • climax
  • The conflict of the story was when Cassius came to Brutus, who was Caesars friend with a problem. The problem was due to Caesars increasing power of Rome. Cassius pursuades Brutus to join a conspiracy to kill Caesar to stop his rein. Brutus struggled with the decision because he loved Caesar but he ended up joining because he loved Rome more.
  • falling action
  • The rising action is when all of the conspirators get together and discuss the plan to kill Caesar. The date they planned was March 15th and as it was approaching there was a storm in Rome. Caesars wife was nervous as rumors of his murder spread though the village. She asked Caesar to stay home but he didn't listen and went by himself around the town.
  • denoument
  • We reach the climax of the story when Caesar meets his death. The conspirators surround him pretending to talk to him. They all take turns stabbing him until he falls and dies in the street.
  • The falling action is when everyone meets in the capital and Marck Antony and Brutus give their speeches. The citizens get angry when they hear of the conspirators and chase after them to kill them. There was a war where Cassius died and then Brutus killed himself.
  • Marck Antony learned of Brutus's death and went back to the capital to share the news. Brutus killed himself and that was known as an honorable act. The citizens then respected him because he killing himself showed how he honored Rome
Just Created with Storyboard That
Explore Our Articles and Examples

Try Our Other Websites!

Photos for Class – Search for School-Safe, Creative Commons Photos (It Even Cites for You!)
Quick Rubric – Easily Make and Share Great-Looking Rubrics