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The Battle of Lexington and Concord

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Storyboard Description

Shot Heard Round the world American Revolution Comic Strip - The Battle of Lexington and Concord

Storyboard Text

  • BRITISH ACTIONS
  • INITIAL CALL TO LEXINGTON AND CONCORD
  • PREPARATION AND FORCES
  • ACTIONS DURING BATTLE
  • EFFECTS OF BATTLE
  • AMERICAN ACTIONS
  • The British received word that there were weapons and ammunition being held by colonial militia forces in Concord. They decided to march on Concord in the hopes of capturing John Hancock and Samuel Adams, now rebels.
  • The British marched on Concord and Lexington with a force of 700, leaving Boston under the leadership of General John Pitcairn. They arrived at Lexington and Concord on the morning of April 19th, 1775 to find opposing colonial forces.
  • The British arrived and had a small skirmish with colonial forces in Lexington. Upon arriving in Concord, they were met with a much greater force. The 'shot heard round' the world' took place, as the British battle colonial forces into retreat. However, they would be continuously attacked on their march back to Boston, resulting in further losses.
  • The British lost 73 men with over 150 wounded. Furthermore, they were surprised by the tenacity and courage of the colonial forces, which would serve as an underlying theme of the revolution.
  • The colonial militia had prepared to fight and defend themselves from British forces. Weeks in advance, colonial forces had learned of the British intelligence on their supply hold and prepared for their arrival. Also aiding their intelligence were revolutionary leaders Paul Revere and William Dawes, who warned much of the countryside.
  • The colonial forces gathered and prepared to defend the supply stock at Concord with a force of 400. They were armed and ready, having had word that the British were indeed arriving.
  • Colonial forces met British forces in both Lexington and Concord. Despite conflicting testimonies after the battle, colonists insisted the British had provoked the fighting, and soon the colonial militia fought back. Using their knowledge of the terrain and geography, colonial forces continued to fire upon the British on their march back to Boston.
  • For colonial forces, the fighting at Lexington and Concord marked the beginning of their fight for independence. Although they will lost 49 men and more than 50 were injured, colonists gained confidence in their fight against British forces.
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