Questions About Remote Learning? Click Here

https://www.storyboardthat.com/blog/e/5-ela-activities

It’s no secret that storyboards are an extremely useful tool for visual communication. But what you might not know is how much more useful storyboards are when the cell size is increased to 16x9. While 16x9 has been the industry standard in movie making for many years, we feel it is also a great layout for teachers!

Read on for 5 ways teachers can use our 16x9 layout during ELA units!

(And while you’re at it, learn more about our 2-week free trial.)


Plot Diagrams


Create a Storyboard*



Your students can create their own summaries by filling in a plot diagram! Each cell can be each step in the Narrative Arc, or alternatively, each cell could be an act in a play, stanza in a poem, or chapter in novel! Using a 16x9 layout is perfect because it allows the student to include more characters, dialogue, and detail in general.


Get other ideas on creating plot diagrams.


Literary Conflict Analysis


Create a Storyboard*



A key aspect to many works of literature is the idea of conflict. Our 16x9 layout makes it so easy for students to visualize each type of literary conflict in the story. Using the larger description boxes is perfect for adding tons of details and helps students practice reading comprehension and writing skills, too. Win-win!


Find more information on literary conflict.


Character Maps


Create a Storyboard*



A story would be nothing if it weren’t for the characters. Creating a character map enables the student to track specific details about each character while reading!

Our 16x9 layout allows for SO much space to write details about each character. This storyboard can be created digitally or printed out to create a worksheet that students can write on with a pen or pencil.


Pro-Tip: The grey/white lined boxes can be found under 16x9 Scenes > Patterns (it appears blue/white in the storyboard creator, but I changed the colors!).


Personal Connection to the Text

The Fault in Our Stars Personal Connection

Create a Storyboard*



For many students, connecting to the messages within a work of literature can be difficult, if not impossible. Using a 16x9 storyboard, instruct students to create a scene, or many scenes, that shows how they can connect to a specific theme or the entire story as a whole. The 16x9 layout is important here since it allows for more space to include as many details as possible.

In this example, the student has picked a specific passage from The Fault in Our Stars and given ways that they connect with it.

Try this activity with your students and see how much they can include using this larger layout!

Current Events / Historical References


Create a Storyboard*



A great way to expand students’ knowledge of important ELA topics and events is by investigating historical events, key births/deaths, and other happenings that occurred each day!

Using the 16x9 layout, ask that students research what happened in history on a chosen day and then create a storyboard about it! Here, we found out that on June 30, 1936, Gone with the Wind was published. Then, we found out that Gone with the Wind was actually the first movie to be completely storyboarded before film production began! How cool is that?!


Image Attributions


Education Pricing

This pricing structure is only available to academic institutions. Storyboard That accepts purchase orders.

Single Teacher

Single Teacher

As low as /month

Start My Trial

Department

Department

As low as /month

Learn More

School

School/District

As low as /month

Learn More

*(This will start a 2-Week Free Trial - No Credit Card Needed)
Find this and other great teacher resources in our Education Blog!
View All Teacher Resources
https://www.storyboardthat.com/blog/e/5-ela-activities
© 2020 - Clever Prototypes, LLC - All rights reserved.
Over 13 Million Storyboards Created
Storyboard That Family