Rizal 001

Updated: 10/1/2021
Rizal 001

Storyboard Text

  • Hello! I am Senator Jose P. Laurel, the sponsor of the Rizal Bill.
  • Oh hello there! I am Senator Claro M. Recto, the author of the Rizal Bill.
  • No! We don't want that kind of bill.
  • Hmm. I've got an idea. I know what to do!
  • It is Senator Claro M. Recto who authored the Rizal Bill. While Senator Jose P. Laurel, Sr., who was then the Chairman of the Committee on Education, sponsored the bill in the Senate. Both of them were known for their great sense of nationalism.
  • The bill is no longer a bill, but a law now. Hooray!
  • However, Senator Mariano Cuenco, Francisco Rodrigo, and Decosoro Rosales struggled to sustain their ardent opposition to the bill.
  • Do you know Rizal Law?
  • Do you mean R.A. 1425? Absolutely!
  • Also, the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines was outspoken in its opposition to the proposal, citing anti-clerical undertones in the novels by Rizal – Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. But then they accused Senator Recto being a communist and anti-Catholic.
  • Oh! I remember those conditions. It is economic, political and social conditions.
  • Do remember what teacher have discussed about the conditions of the Philippines in the advent of Rizal?
  • The Republic Act was signed by the President on June 12, 1956. The Rizal Law, also known as RA 1425, mandates the study of Rizal’s life and works, as shown in section 1. This Republic Act calls for an increased sense of nationalism from the Filipinos during a time of a dwindling Filipino identity.
  • Another important point from RA 1425 is “Whereas, all educational institutions are under the supervision of, and subject to regulation by the State, and all schools are enjoined to develop moral character, personal discipline, civic conscience, and to teach the duties of citizenship.” It is very important to use our educational institutions to instill these values to the children who are at their prime years of growing and learning.
  • In addition to the Rizal Law, there were three conditions of the Philippines in the advent of Rizal, namely: Economic conditions (Taxation, Conversion, Control, Spaniards, Mezstizos, chinese, and Indios), Political conditions (Cadiz Constitution), and Social conditions (Principalia, Gobernadorcillo, etc.). In addition to the Rizal Law, there were three conditions of the Philippines in the advent of Rizal, namely: Economic conditions (Taxation, Conversion, Control, Spaniards, Mezstizos, chinese, and Indios), Political conditions (Cadiz Constitution), and Social conditions (Principalia, Gobernadorcillo, etc.)
  • Class dismissed! Goodbye class. Please study more about the conditions of the Philippines in the advent of Rizal.