Bomb Comic Strip

Bomb Comic Strip
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  • "Wigner spotted a young boy, about seven, walking along the side of the road holding a fishing rod. He pulled over. Szilard leaned his sweaty head out the car window. 'Say,' he began, 'do you by any chance know where Einstein lives?' The boy looked up, and said, 'Of course.'                                                                                        page 19 & 20
  • "Albert Einstein stood on the porch of his rented cottage, looking cool, tan, and relaxed in loose pants, a T-shirt, and slippers. His famous mane of white hair was windswept from a morning of sailing on Long Island Sound."                                                                                                 page 20
  • To: F.D, Roosevelt From: Albert Einstein
  • "After a few minutes of small talk, Szilard and Wigner brought up the subject they'd come to discuss. They told Einstein about the newest discoveries in fission and explained how uranium might be used to build devastating bombs."                                                                                                                                                                                                   page 20
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  • "'He volunteered to do whatever he could to prevent it.' Wigner got out a pen and a piece of paper. He took notes as Szilard and Einstein worked out the text of a letter to President Roosevelt."                                                                                                 page 20
  • "On October 11, in Washington, D.C., an economist named Alexander Sachs showed his ID to security guards outside the White House. He walked into the building with Albert Einstein's letter in his briefcase."                                                                                                 page 20
  • "Sachs explained the warning in Einstein's letter. 'The element uranium may be turned into a new and important source of energy in the immediate future,'"                                                                                                 page 21
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