Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)

Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)

Storyboard Text

  • Aaron Ogden and Thomas Gibbons argue about the permission to run ferries along the Hudson River.
  • Well, I actually do have the right to operate my two ferries according to the federal licensing act of 1793 which regulates coastal commerce!
  • Hey, you can't run your two ferries on my route! The state of New York gave ME an exclusive license to operate steamboat ferries between New Jersey and New York City!
  • In New York Court...
  • This is unacceptable! I'm going to the New York Supreme Court!
  • I order Thomas Gibbons to cease operating his steamships on the Hudson River!
  • In the New York Supreme Court...
  • Y'all too?!? This is unacceptable! I appeal to the US Supreme Court!
  • Like the New York Court, I also order Thomas Gibbons to cease operating his steamships on the Hudson River!
  • In the US Supreme Court...
  • So what exactly does this mean?
  • According to the Commerce Clause of the Constitution, Congress may pass any law that regulates interstate commerce, meaning Congress has the authority to regulate the commercial steamboat route between New York and New Jersey.
  • Thank you so much Chief Justice John Marshall! I'm free to operate my steamships now! I'm so happy! Yay!
  • I, Chief Justice John Marshall, rule that New York's exclusive grant to Aaron Ogden violated the federal licensing act of 1793. Congress, not the state of New York, has the authority to regulate interstate commerce, making the New York law unconstitutional. New York's injunction against Thomas Gibbons will be overturned.
  • The Supreme Court Case of Gibbons v. Ogden (1824) increased the power of Congress, ruling that according to the Commercial Clause of the Constitution, Congress has the right to regulate all commerce that crosses state lines. This case increased federal power more than any other case of the time. It illustrates Congress's power to overturn state regulations, demonstrating differences between state power and federal power.
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