The Tragedy Of Julius Caesar (Part 2)

The Tragedy Of Julius Caesar (Part 2)
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  • Act II, Scene iv
  • "I prithee, boy, run to the Senate House; Stay not to answer me, but get thee gone."(II.iv.1-2)
  • "Run to the Capitol, and nothing else? And so return to you, and nothing else?"(II.iv.11-12)
  • Act III, scene i
  • "Et tu, Brute? Then fall, Caesar." (III.i.77)
  • Act III, scene ii
  • Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire! Kill! Slay! Let not a Traitor live!" (III.ii.205-206)
  • Look at what these "Honorable Men" have done!
  • Portia tells Lucius, Brutus's servant, to do nothing more than to run to the capitol and observe how Caesar is doing. The soothsayer than appears and is asked by Portia if Caesar has already gone to the capitol. He replies that he hasn't and will stand in his path to speak with him.
  • Act III scene iii
  • "I am Cinna the poet! I am Cinna the poet!" (III.iii.29)
  • "Tear him!, tear him! Come, brands, ho! Firebrands! To Brutus, to Cassius!"(III.iii.35-36)
  • Caesar along with the conspirators approach the capitol when they are met by the soothsayer and Artemidorus who try to warn Caesar, to no avail. Inside the Capital, the conspirators request a repeal on Cimber's banishment. Upon denying the request, Caesar is stabbed by all the conspirators, and finally killed by Brutus. Antony after being guaranteed safety, comes to the capital to hear the reasons as to why they did this. Brutus promises answers, but after the people are calm.
  • Act IV, scene i
  • "So is my horse, Octavius."(IV.i.29-30)
  • To calm the angry masses outside, Brutus tells the people that he killed Caesar because he feared that the Romans would become slaves of his ambition. The people cheer Brutus for what he has done, but he quiets them so Antony can give his speech while he leaves. Antony without saying it, disproves what Brutus said about Caesar's ambition. The crowd grows angry and calls the conspirators traitors, but become bloodthirsty after Antony reads Caesar's will revealing his generosity.
  • Act IV, scene ii and some iii.
  • "Did not great Julius bleed for justice' sake? What villian touched his body, that did stab, And not for justice?"(IV.iii.19-21)
  • A man by the name of Cinna walks through a street when he meets the angry mob of plebeians who ask him his name. When he replies that his name is Cinna, the mob mistakes him for a conspirator, and brutally kill him. 
  •  Antony meets with Octavius and Lepidus at his house and decide on who must be killed. Lepidus agrees to kill his brother if Antony agrees to kill his nephew, and Lepidus departs. Antony is concerned about Lepidus being a ruler, and calls him nothing more than a tool for them to use against the conspirators. Antony then reports that it is up to them to stop Brutus and Cassius from consolidating any more power. 
  • "You may do your will; But [Lepidus] is a tried and valiant soldier."(IV.i.27-28)
  • Brutus and his men await at his camp when Cassius arrives to express his ever-growing anger with Brutus. They then move into Brutus's tent where they get into an argument about corruption, and they start to insult each other. The argument ends in Brutus and Cassius forgiving each other. Brutus then reveals his anger came from his wife killing herself shortly before.
  • "Brutus, bait not me; I'll not endure it. You forget yourself To hedge me in. I am a soldier."(IV.iii.28-30)
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