Women's Rights in the 1800s

Women's Rights in the 1800s
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Storyboard Description

Mothered by reformers such as Beecher, Anthony, Stanton, and Blackwell, the women's rights movement originated and first gained traction in the United States during the 19th century. Their importance as major roles in this movement is widely known and the effects and impact of their work continue to be felt today.

Storyboard Text

  • In the 19th century, there were strong institutionalized gender roles in the United States. While women were expected to endow wisdom on the young and to be a source of guidance, men were assigned to be similar to savages without the love of women.
  • I am Catharine Beecher, a reformer popularizing the notion that the home and the kitchen are sacred places for women and that they are designed to belong in both the domestic life and in the classroom.
  • Many former housewives, most of them white and wealthy, feeling trapped by the societal stereotypes and being affected by the Second Great Awakening, became social reformers who fought for the abolition of slavery and temperance. 
  • We, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, along with all Suzy Bs across this nation are fighting for reform, through our marriage vows to nationwide lectures.
  • "...We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness..." (Stanton)
  • Although the fight against slavery took center stage, the change women like Mott and Blackwell brought onto society was undeniable. Gradually, but surely, women were getting accepted into colleges and wives were allowed ownership of property. These women set the ultimate foundation of women's rights for generations to come.
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