Caesar Final

Caesar Final

Storyboard Text

  • Brutus Talks to Cassius"Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers"
  • (Pg. 50, Ln. 166-167)
  • "Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers"
  • Brutus talks/explains to crowd
  • (Pg. 71 Ln. 109-110)
  • "...Waving our red weapons o'er our heads, let's all cry, "Peace, freedom, and liberty""
  • Brutus plans with Lucilius and Cassius
  • (Pg. 94, Ln. 22-23)
  • "They mean this night in Sardis to be quartered; The greater part, the horse in general, are come with Cassius..."
  • ..."There are no tricks in simple faith; But hollow men, like horses hot at hand, make gallant show and promise of their mettle.
  • A small but somewhat broad quote from Brutus shows his mindset on the murder, how he only wishes for the best for Rome. The comparison used between being a sacrificer vs butcher reveals that the Brutus' mindset for the killing is not out of rage or revenge.
  • Brutus and Antony try to convince residents of Rome
  • (Pg. 80, Ln. 38-41)
  • "The question of his death; his glory not extenuated, wherein he was worthy; nor his offenses enforced, for which he suffered death."
  • His patriotic spirit when in speech only creates a protest-like environment and shows his intense care for Rome and its people.Whether or not he convinces the crowd of his truthful reasoning he does show that the betrayal of his country is far from his intentions.
  • Brutus and companions after Caesar murder
  • (Pg. 71 Ln. 103-104)
  • Brutus converses with the two allies at an army camp near Sardis, proving to his pears he has no face fear for death in battle. Brutus truely showing not just his heroism but also his undying fidelity to Rome and its people.
  • Brutus and Cassius before war
  • (Pg. 71 Ln. 103-104)
  • "...By which I did blame Cato for the death Which he did give himself; I know not how But I do find it cowardly and vile..."
  • Brutus' harsh direction in his conversion with the crowd shows the "dark side" of the murder, whether an honorable one or not. Putting the face value of facts into a situation in the death of one of Romes greatest leaders is nothing to play.
  • The minor insult of Caesars death in the moment of action brings shame to Brutus' name. The gang recognizes the reasoning for action in the murder and Brutus lightly mocks it.
  • "Grant that, and then is death a benefit. So are we Caesar's friends, that have abridged His time of fearing death..."
  • Respecting the dead is not only a necessity in society but coming from one once battled with is new. He shows no remorse in this line for the deceased friend he once had.
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