To Build a Fire storyboard

To Build a Fire storyboard

Storyboard Text

  • The fire represents protection from the fierce elements of Nature.
  • “There was fire , promising life with every dancing flame”.
  • London’s repeated use of the old man highlights how the young man underestimates the unpredictability of Nature.
  • Thank you for your advice
  • I don’t need your advice
  • London's contrast between the dog's instincts and the man's ego and intelligence illustrates how nature cannot be overcome.
  • I don't know why, but we shouldn't be here.
  • Nature can't stop me
  • The evidence shows how the fire serves as a refuge from the cold for the man. In addition, the failure of the man to properly build a fire for the second time is what ultimately drives his death, as his body is unable to function without heat.
  • The absence of a loving relationship between the man and the dog explains how the man views the dog as an expendable resource.
  • I don't want to go!
  • C'mon doggy! Go across the ice.
  • The young man's statement that he “was grateful for the advice of the old man" contrasts with his subsequent statement that "those old men were rather womanish" and that "any man who was a man could travel alone". The contrast between the attitudes displayed by both men towards Nature (the old man warns of the dangers of Nature while the young man is careless about his travels) emphasizes London's point about how one shouldn't underestimate Nature.
  • As his journey wears on, and the man commits more errors along the way, he gradually gives up on fighting for his survival.
  • "Freezing to death isn't that bad".
  • When London writes that "the dog did not know anything about temperature" and that "in its brain there was no understanding of a condition of very cold, such as was in the man's brain", but that "[the dog] still sensed the danger", he demonstrates how the man's perception of his abilities to stay safe are outweighed by the dog's reliance on its instinctual understanding of the danger of their current situation.
  • London's portrayal of Nature as a uncaring entity is an example of a Naturalist text, which often illustrate Nature's disregard for the plight of mankind.
  • The man's repeated use of the dog as a guinea pig in testing out several dangers in the Yukon demonstrates how he views the dog only as a tool for his survival instead of a loyal companion.
  • Before he lays down, the man makes futile attempts to save himself, but when he realizes "that he would never get to the camp and the boys" because "the freezing had too great a start and that he would soon be dead", he accepts his situation by gradually giving up on trying to survive.
  • Throughout "To Build A Fire", Nature serves as an antagonist to the man's survival as it frequently obstructs his progress towards reaching the camp. The extremely cold temperature, the snow extinguishing the man's fire, and the man's fall into the frozen lake are all examples of Nature's apathy towards the man's situation.
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