Cattle, Oil, and Ranching Story

Cattle, Oil, and Ranching Story
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  • Cattle
  • MOOOOO
  • Cattle
  • MOOOOO
  • Oil
  • I wish this city was cleaner.
  • The ranchers valued the longhorn because they could get so many useful things. They would refer to longhorns as “8 pounds of hamburger on 800 pounds of bone and horn.” The ranchers would also make many things out of their horns, such as buttons, cups, decor, furniture and other useful household items. But in the 1850s, when the civil war broke out, their value increased because they had little supply of beef, so the demand grew. Yet when the war dragged on Texans found it hard to move their cattle. Which resulted in many mavericks, or unclaimed cattle.
  • Oil
  • YAAY!
  • Since the railroads were the main transportation, Texas ranchers needed to adapt. A good solution to that was cattle drives. During the winter and fall months the cattle would graze on the open range, and in the spring they would round up the cattle, including mavericks. So when the grass turned green they would drive the cattle north.
  • Railroad
  • Just loading up this train with all this cotton 
  • According to a Texas school teacher, the men in the oil business worked day shifts and night shifts, business men lived in their offices, and they worked Sunday. The boomtowns were not very pleasant places to raise families so there were relatively few women and children living there. The oil field workers usually live in tents or shacks. There were also many gambling and drinking places, targeted at the workers, which made these boomtowns dangerous.
  • Railroad
  • We can’t wait for the trains to be built!
  • The discovery of Spindletop led to many jobs, which meant that the population grew as well. Beaumonts population grew by nearly 40,000 people, and by 1902 there were more than 500 oil companies operating at Spindletop. The production of oil peeked in 1902 at more than 17 million barrels of oil. With large oil amounts being produced comes the national demand being outpaced, so the prices dropped dramatically. By 1904 Spindletop was almost out so it only produces about 10,000 barrels of oil each day., so that led to many companies going out of business. The oil companies that did survive became very important to the Texas economy
  • Now that the oil is here I’ll have a job!
  • The increase of railroads to ship products encouraged the agriculture industry to expand. Railroads were a cheap way to ship the massive amounts of cotton being produced. The railroads also accommodated the cotton farmers by offering lower rates and building large cotton loading platforms at each stop. From 1874 to 1878, the amount of cotton shipped on the Texas and Pacific railway more than tripled. The railroad companies also transported other valuable crops such as fruits, rice, and vegetables.
  • Since the transportation all over Texas was poor Texans were very excited about the arrival of railroads The railroads promised a cheap, fast, and dependable means of transportation. A 35 mile trip would regularly take a day and a half, but by train it only took 2 hours. It was also much cheaper to ship goods by train than by wagons. By 1861 there were about 470 miles of rail lines in Texas. The constitution of 1876 banned the local bonds but allowed the legislature to pass land grants, so Texas eventually gave more than 32 million acres of land to more than 40 railroad companies
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