siddartha
Updated: 2/9/2021
siddartha

Storyboard Text

  • "There was nothing more than a deep, painful longing...to make an end of this bitter, painful life" (88).
  • "At that moment, when the sound of Om reached Siddartha's ears, his slumbering soul suddenly awakened and he recognized the follow of action... he was so lost, so confused, so devoid of all reason that he had sought death" (89).
  • "his sleep was deep and dreamless; he had not slept like that in a long time. When he awakened after many hours...he remembered where he was and how he had come to be there" (89).
  • Siddartha sees no reason to continue living, since he left home to discover his Self on his own but instead indulged in the pleasures of everyday life. He feels sickened with the fact that he has made almost no progress towards the goal he started out with. This is Siddartha's abyss -- he is at the lowest point of his life and is left completely alone.
  • "his sleep was deep and dreamless; he had not slept like that in a long time. When he awakened after many hours...he remembered where he was and how he had come to be there" (89). "I know you, Govinda, from your father's house and from the Brahmin's school and from sacrifices, and from our sojourn with the Samanas and from that hour in the grove of Jetavana" (92).
  • Siddhartha finds ataraxia in his old prayers, prayers that remind of him of his past life and his purpose. He realizes that killing himself would be shameful because he would be running from his problems. Siddartha starts to atone for even thinking of suicide. He uses Om to climb out of the Abyss and to reach his revelation.
  • "his sleep was deep and dreamless; he had not slept like that in a long time. When he awakened after many hours...he remembered where he was and how he had come to be there" (89). "I have experienced so much stupidity, so many vices, so much error, so much nausea, disillusionment and sorrow in order to become a child again and begin anew" (96-97).
  • Siddhartha's deep slumber symbolizes his spiritual rebirth. He wakes up with a new perception of life. He reflects on his physical and spiritual journey that led to him reaching this point. He has reached the Transformation stage of the Hero's Journey.
  • "Happily, he looked into the flowing river...Siddhartha had wanted to drown himself in this river... The new Siddhartha felt a deep love for this flowing water" (91).
  • When Siddhartha wakes up, he sees his old childhood friend, Govinda, watching over him. Siddhartha recognizes Govinda because he still resembles his past self but Siddhartha has transformed so much to the point where he was unrecognizable. This confrontation from his childhood friend signifies Siddhartha returning back to the normal world.
  • Siddhartha's transformation and different perspective is clearly illustrated in this scene, where he sees the river as a source of beauty rather than danger. He is no longer in an abyss and has reached a state of pure happiness.