Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet
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  • Act II, Scene II
  • Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye. Than twenty of their swords. Look thou but sweet, and I am proof against their enmity.
  • If they do see thee they will murder thee!
  • Act II, Scene III
  • Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied. And vice sometime by action dignified.
  • Act II, Scene VI
  • Ah, Juliet, if the measure of thy joy, Be heaped like mine, and that thy skill be more.To blazon it, then sweeten with thy breath. Unfold the imagined happiness that both, Receive in either by this dear encounter.
  • Come, come with me, and we’ll do the job quickly. Because if you don’t mind, I’m not leaving you two alone until you’re united in marriage.
  • Late at night, Romeo catches a glimpse of Juliet standing in the balcony after he secretly scales a wall guarding Capulet's orchard in order to see her.  When Juliet notices Romeo, she fearfully expresses her concern that he will be murdered by her family members if he is found. However Romeo assures Juliet that despite his danger of being in a relationship with her, her passionate love for him will serve as his protection.
  • When Friar Laurence collects herbs at dawn, he uses them as a metaphor for good vs. evil, as he states that they can be medicine (good), but also poison, if overused (evil). Then, he explains that people's actions work like herbs as virtues (good deeds) turn into vice (evil deeds), if they are misused. But, vice can transform into virtue if there are right intentions. He potentially refers to Romeo's act of loving Juliet and how it can go both ways.
  • Romeo and Juliet visit Friar Lawrence in his lair to secretly marry each other, since they hail from warring families and face dire consequences if their relationship is discovered. Romeo expresses his anticipation for all the happiness they will share as a couple. Friar Lawrence fears that Romeo and Juliet will be too intimate before rightfully taking the sacred vows of marriage. Thus, urges them to marry quickly. 
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