Primary Inquiry Part 2
Updated: 7/17/2020
Primary Inquiry Part 2
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Storyboard Text

  • Source: FjØrtoft,I. (2001). The natural environment as a playground for children: The impact ofoutdoor play activities in pre-primary school children. Early ChildhoodEducation Journal, 29(2), 111-117Staempfli, M B. 2009. “Reintroducing Adventure intoChildren’s Outdoor Play Environments.” Environment and Behavior 41, no 2(March): 268–80.
  • How can we as educators increase outdoor unstructured play?
  • Focus on adventure and nature with students Provide objects and materials that are open-ended and non-dictated; no suggested "story" behind the materialsTry not to get too involved in play, because can disrupt the flow of language, thought or dramatic playFind ways to incorporate nature and outdoor time into various curriculum expectations
  • Ideas of curriculum expectations that could be covered through outdoor unstructured play:1. Grade 2, Science & Technology: 1.1 identify positive and negative impacts that animals have on humans (society) and the environment, form an opinion about one of them, and suggest ways in which the impact can be minimized or enhanced.1.2 identify positive and negative impacts that different kinds of human activity have on animals and where they live, form an opinion about one of them, and suggest ways in which the impact can be minimized or enhancedAfter students spend time playing outdoors, educators can ask students if they saw any animals outside, and how our presence outdoors might impact the animals and their homes. 2. Grade 1, Social Studies:B1.1 describe some of the ways in which people make use of natural and built features of, and human services in, the local community to meet their needs, and what might happen if these features/services did not existB1.3 create a plan that outlines some specific ways in which they can responsibly interact with the built and/or natural environment in the local communityAfter spending time outdoors, educators can ask students about the environment they were playing in; what did you notice?; what things in nature did you interact with?; What have we as humans done to the environment that you are playing in?
  • Connections to Curriculum:
  • References:FjØrtoft, I. (2001). The natural environment as a playground for children:The impact of outdoor play activities in pre-primary school children. EarlyChildhood Education Journal, 29(2), 111-117Kemple, K M, J Oh, E Kenneyand T Smith-Bonahue. 2016. “The Power of Outdoor Play and Play in NaturalEnvironments.” Childhood Education 92, no 6: 446–54.Staempfli, M B. 2009.“Reintroducing Adventure into Children’s Outdoor Play Environments.”Environment and Behavior 41, no 2 (March): 268–80.Sobchuk, K., Connolly, S.,& Sheehan, D. (2019). Exploring the Literature on the Benefits of Natureand Outdoor Play and the Role of Play Leaders. Runner, 36.
  • By: Alexandra Robins
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