Othello Embedded Task #2

Othello Embedded Task #2
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  • Maybe because I'm black, and I don't have nice manners like courtiers do, or because I'm getting old... She's gone, and I've  been cheated on. (III.iii.267-271)
  • Was someone as beautiful as you meant to be a whore? (IV.ii.75-76)
  • I swear to God you're accusing me wrongly! (IV.ii.86)
  • Did you see how he laughed about sleeping with her? (IV.i.162)
  • How should I murder him, Iago? (IV.i.161)
  • This scene demonstrates one of the internal conflicts present in the drama. When struck with the sudden possibility of Desdemona cheating on him, Othello immediately begins to feel insecure (person vs self). The fact that he is so self-conscious about his race and looks makes him easy prey for Iago. Iago feeds on those insecurities by playing with Othello's emotions, which makes Othello feel like he wasn't good enough for Desdemona. It propels the plot by leading Othello to a terrible path filled with jealousy and hatred. This scene shows importance because it will be the beginning of Othello's revenge against his own wife.
  • This scene demonstrates one of Othello's internal conflicts. When struck with the sudden possibility of Desdemona cheating on him, he immediately begins to feel insecure. The fact that he is so self-conscious about his race and looks makes him easy prey for Iago. It propels the plot by leading him to believe that Desdemona is truly cheating on him. This scene shows importance because it will be the beginning of Othello's vengeful plans against his own wife.
  • This scene is an example of external conflict in the text, specifically between Othello and Desdemona (person vs person). In the drama, Othello was manipulated by Iago into believing that Desdemona is cheating on him. This led to Othello developing extreme feelings of hatred towards his once beloved Desdemona. In this scene, Othello argues with her and calls her a whore, demonstrating the conflict. This propels the plot because it puts Iago's vengeful plans into action, and officially flips the switch on Othello and Desdemona's relationship for the worse.
  • This scene is yet another example of external conflict presented in the drama. Although Cassio isn't present in the scene, the conversational exchange between Othello and Iago exhibits a conflict between Othello and Cassio (person vs person). Iago, who relentlessly continues to manipulate Othello, motions for Othello to hide while he speaks with Cassio. They speak about manners revolving Bianca, since she is Cassio's real lover. However, Othello believes that they are talking about Desdemona, and how she slept with Cassio. Following these events, the scene shown above propels the plot because it shows how every last bit of hope that Othello had was destroyed. Now, without a doubt in his mind, Othello is ready to get even with Cassio for having an affair with his wife, which is shown when he asks Iago how to murder him. Iago's mission to get Othello to believe he has been cheated on was now working in his favor without any flaws.
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