Questions About Remote Learning? Click Here

English Performance Task #1
Updated: 9/7/2020
English Performance Task #1
This storyboard was created with StoryboardThat.com

Storyboard Text

  • It doesn't matter who you are or where you are from because you can still achieve anything.
  • It doesn't matter who you are or where you are from because you can still achieve anything.
  • It doesn't matter who you are or where you are from because you can still achieve anything.
  • *YAWN*
  • "Thomas was sitting in the cafeteria boasting about his slam dunking prowess with a few from the track team. Carlos Mattis, Lindenwood’s top high jumper, had enough of Thomas’ lip and bet him" (Epstein). Thomas was just a student at a university who had accidentally gotten himself into a bet. This is how his career in high-jump begins, and he starts very late compared to others, and in a much randomer way.
  • Genes can help people achieve just as much or more than people who have worked harder than them.
  • "...rigid form akin to a man riding an invisible deck chair backward through the air, Thomas cleared 7’3.25”, a Lantz Indoor Fieldhouse record. That’s when Coach Lohr forced him to stop out of concern that he might hurt himself," (Epstein). Despite just starting Thomas had achieved much, like breaking his university's record. He had never attempted the high jump before, he was just a regular kid trying to get through university.
  • Genes can help people achieve just as much or more than people who have worked harder than them.
  • "The guy in pole vault shoes who thinks high jump is “kind of boring” was crowned the 2007 world champion," (Epstein). He had achieved something that most athletes would never even qualify for. If he had reached this point so early in his career it is possible for all of us to try and follow our dreams.
  • Genes can help people achieve just as much or more than people who have worked harder than them.
  • Thomas had already made it to the world championships without much training. "...with a total of eight months of legitimate high-jump training to his name, Thomas...traveled to Osaka for the World Championships," (Epstein). Thomas had seemed to be naturally gifted.
  • Thomas was on par with one of the previous Olympic champions in the high jump. "Thomas advanced easily to the final, as did Stefan Holm [the reigning Olympic champion]. When the men’s high jump finalists were introduced, broadcasters announced a laser focused Holm as the favorite. Thomas, looking cool in sunglasses beneath the bright lights illuminating the stadium, was described as “very much an unknown quantity," (Epstein). Without practice, the only way he could've made it this far is if he had some physical advantage from his genetic makeup.
  • Ishiwaka describes the reason why Thomas was able to beat Holm when he had much less experience than Holm and passion. "Thomas’s long legs relative to his height and also that he was gifted with a giant’s Achilles tendon. Whereas Holm’s Achilles was a more normal sized, incredibly stiff spring, The longer (and stiffer) the Achilles tendon, the more elastic energy it can store when compressed. All the better to rocket the owner into the air," (Epstein). This evidence shows that genes can help people achieve just as much as someone who had to work harder to reach the same level.
Over 14 Million Storyboards Created
Storyboard That Family