The Giver Theme Analysis

The Giver Theme Analysis
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Storyboard Description

The various scenes within the Giver that prove a theme.

Storyboard Text

  • When the word Release is tossed around, we are left confused as the readers.
  • Well, if Gabriel doesn't fit the baby requirements, he will be Released.
  • As Jonas's mother talks about how, as a lawyer. she has to keep track of the crimes of the community, Jonas is frightened by the term 'release' his mom refers to, but he doesn't know what it is. Is it a punishment?
  • "I feel frightened, too, for him. You know that there's no third chance. The rules say that if there's a third transgression, he simply has to be released." (Lowry 9).
  • At the house of old, Jonas talks to an elderly woman as he bathes her. From her, it sounds like release is some sort of paradise. Is it a gift?
  • Oh Roberto had a great life! His release was amazing, and he was so happy. He had the biggest smile on his face when he went through the doors to Elsewhere.
  • Release is a mystery in the community that no one has ever questioned. Whether it is good or bad, the people aren't concerned at all. For generations, is seems that not one person had the curiosity to ask questions about such topics.
  • Didn't someone apply for release when we were younger?
  • "She said that it was really true. Here today and gone tomorrow. Never seen again. Not even a Ceremony of Release." (Lowry 48).
  • The Giver decides to show Jonas the truth behind release after showing a release earlier that morning. It is performed by his father, and the answer to the long brought out question shakes the readers and Jonas to the core.
  • It is time for you to know the truth, Jonas.
  • Oh, okay.
  • The theme of the Importance of Knowledge and Truth is recognized in the novel, The Giver. The Elders of the Committee obstruct the truth of death to the members of the community. They cover up the fact that they kill off those who aren't helpful by calling it 'release'. Their deaths are tributes for creating a 'perfect' society. This shows how important knowledge and truth is prominent in the story.
  • "He killed it! My father killed it!" (Lowry 150). 
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