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Salem Witch Trials
Updated: 10/14/2020
Salem Witch Trials
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Storyboard Text

  • By the end of the Salem Witch trials, a total of 141 people were arrested, 19 were hung, and one was crushed to death. The Salem Witch Trials can be traced to Rev. Samual Paris. Upon his return to Massachusetts, he brought with him, two slaves. One slave Tituba cared for his 9-year-old daughter Elizabeth and his 11-year-old niece Abigal. Tituba would pass on stories about voodoo. Other girls in the village soon joined in and they would tell each other's fortune. It eventually got out of hand and the girls started to throw fits, making strange noises and contorting their bodies. Soon, Rev. Paris brought in Dr. William Griggs and he couldn't find a medical condition and he diagnosed with bewitchment. The 17th century Puritans believed that witchcraft as a cause of death and sickness. They believed that witches gained their power from the devil and it was decided that they needed to find the witches responsible and kill them. The first accused of witchcraft were the slaves Tituba, Sarah Good, and Sarah Osborne.
  • Paris and Griggs
  • Samual Paris, Tituba, Elizabeth and Abigal
  • Puritans trying to kill the witches
  • Salem
  • Girls from village
  • Rev. Burroughs was the minister at Salem before and had created some enemies. Rev. Burroughs was accused of being the coven leader and more arrests in the Salem Witch Trials followed. Since Massachusetts had no formal charter, all the accused had to be held in prison until a new charter was obtained. In 1692, the new governor, Sir William Philps arrived with the new charter. Governor Phips had no interest in the Salem Witch Trials hysteria and so he established a court of Oyer and Terminer to hear the Salem Witch Trials. By the end of May, 100 people were imprisoned on charges of being witches. On June 2nd, the Salem Witch Trials court had its first sitting. The first to be tied was Bridget Bishop who was found guilty.
  • Rev. Burrough was the minister at Salem
  • Governor Phips had no interest in the Salem Witch Trials hysteria
  • On June 2nd, the Salem Witch Trials court had its first sitting
  • He was accused of being the coven leader
  • By the end of May, 100 people were imprisoned on charges of being witches
  • Finally, the colony's ministers took a stand against the Salem Witch Trials. The girl accusers who were mad with power, accused the Governor's wife, Lady Phips of witchcraft. On October 29, Governor Phips had dissolved the Court of Oyer and Terminer. The Governor later asked the general court to establish a superior court to finish the business. The jury ended up acquitting almost all of the accused and only three were convicted, but they were reprieved by the governor. The Salem witch trials were finally over. The people who had participated in the hysteria which included the accusers, clergy, and magistrates. and they all suffered from either illness or problems. In 1703, the Massachusetts colonial legislature began to grant retroactive amnesties to the convicted and executed during the Salem Witch trials
  • The girl accusers who were mad at power accused the governor's wife
  • People who participated fell ill or had problems.
  • The Salem Witch Trials end in 1693.
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