Life of Dred Scott

Life of Dred Scott
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  • Scott went to court to try to earn his freedom.  
  • In the end, Taney stated that "Any person descended from Africans, whether slave or free, is not a citizen of the United States, according to the U.S Constitution.The Ordinance of 1787 could not confer either freedom or citizenship within the Northwest Territory to non-white individuals.The provisions of the Act of 1820, known as the Missouri Compromise, were voided as a legislative act, since the act exceeded the powers of Congress, insofar as it attempted to exclude slavery and impart freedom and citizenship to non-white persons in the northern part of the Louisiana Purchase" (Wikipedia).
  • While Dred Scott did lose, he did eventually gain his freedom in the end. He also inspired other black people to try to get their freedom to. He has a monument in front of the courthouse that his trial took place at.  
  • Blow died, and then Dred was given to his new master. They were constantly in the move, and were traveling from army outpost to outpost. Eventually, they went to fort Snelling, where Dred met his wife, Harriet Scott.
  • Emerson moved to Jefferson Baracks  in 1837, leaving the Scott family behind and leasing them out to other officers. In February 1838, Emerson met and married Eliza Irene Sanford at Fort Jesup in Louisiana, whereupon he sent for the Scotts to join him. While on a steamboat on the Mississippi River, between the free state of Illinois and the Iowa District of Wisconsin Territory, Harriet Scott gave birth to their first child, whom they named Eliza after their mistress. 
  • "The Emersons and Scotts returned to Missouri in 1840. In 1842, Emerson left the Army. After he died in the Iowa Territory in 1843, his widow Irene inherited his estate, including the Scotts. For three years after Emerson's death, she continued to lease out the Scotts as hired slaves. In 1846, Scott attempted to purchase his and his family's freedom, offering $300, about $8,000 in current value. However, Irene Emerson refused, prompting Scott to resort to legal recourse" (Wikipedia).
  • I'll sue you!
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