Chemistry Final Project
Updated: 4/20/2020
Chemistry Final Project
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Storyboard Text

  • After Emma went to rehearsals and couldn't remember her lines at rehearsal, she made sure we kept practicing nonstop. When she was home, the script was never far from her.
  • Oh grandmother, why do you have those big teeth and that big mouth?
  • The more she practiced her lines, the more she was able to remember them. However, she did't let herself get too confident again. She didn't stop practicing, but continued to do so. Instead of going to recess with her friends, she kept studying her lines.
  • Little Red Riding Hood: Oh grandmother, why do you have those big teeth and that big mouth?
  • Emma's constant studying allowed the information to continue to be encoded in her brain. The constant repetition allowed the lines to finally be stored in her long-term memory. Every time she repeats it, she is now retrieving it from her long-term memory to her working memory.
  • Prefrontal Cortex
  • At the next rehearsal, Emma was pleasantly surprised to find that she knew all her lines! All her rehearsing had paid off.
  • Oh grandmother, why do you have those big teeth and that big mouth?
  • Finally, the day of the big show came! Emma knew all her lines and the play was a success.
  • Oh grandmother, why do you have those big teeth and that big mouth?
  • For Emma to memorize the script, the lines went through her sensory, working, and long-term memory. This all took place in her prefrontal cortex.
  • After the play, the lines may stay in Emma's long-term memory until she recalls them or she may forget them. Either way, her brain will be different after her experience.
  • In her brain, axons and dendrites were making synaptic connections. Prion molecules are active in these synapses and help record memories.
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