Macbeth part 2

Macbeth part 2
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  • Lady Macbeth reads a letter sent by her husband. She learns of her husband's encounter with the with the three witches and the prophecy of him becoming king.
  • "They met me in the day of success, and I have learned by the perfectest report they have more in them than mortal knowledge. When I burned in desire to question them further, they made themselves air, into which they vanished. Whiles I stood rapt in the wonder of it came missives from the king, who all-hailed me 'Thane of Cawdor,' by which title, before, these weird sisters saluted me, and referred me to the coming on of time with 'Hail, king that shalt be!' This have I thought good to deliver thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou might’st not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being ignorant of what greatness is promised thee. Lay it to thy heart, and farewell."
  • Macbeth's servant tells Lady Macbeth that the King will be coming to the castle.
  • The king comes here tonight.
  • Lady Macbeth asks spirits to give her the courage to kill King Duncan in order to achieve her ambition of becoming queen.
  • The raven himself is hoarse that croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan under my battlements. Come, you spirits that tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, and fill me from the crown to the toe top-full of direst cruelty. Make thick my blood. Stop up the access and passage to remorse, that no compunctious visitings of nature shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between the effect and it! Come to my woman’s breasts, and take my milk for gall, you murd'ring ministers, wherever in your sightless substances you wait on nature’s mischief. Come, thick night, and pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, that my keen knife see not the wound it makes, nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark to cry “Hold, hold!”
  • Lady Macbeth tells Macbeth of her idea to murder King Duncan.
  • Let us murder King Duncan to fulfil the prophecy of you becoming king.
  • We will speak about this later.
  • Macbeth's will to kill the king is faltering and he questions whether killing the king is really in his best interests.
  • This Duncan hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been so clear in his great office, that his virtues will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against the deep damnation of his taking-off. I have no spur to prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself and falls on th' other.
  • Lady Macbeth and Macbeth argue over whether they should kill the king or not.
  • We will proceed no further in this business. Prithee, peace. I dare do all that may become a man; who dares do more is none.
  • What beast was ’t, then, that made you break this enterprise to me? When you durst do it, then you were a man; and to be more than what you were, you would be so much more the man.
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