Mechanical Weathering

Mechanical Weathering

Storyboard Text

  • Good day, everyone. I'm Ashley, and I'm from the land of Nevana. And today, my brother Trifelle and I have been assigned a project.
  • That is right! Our teacher tasked us to study and observe the rocks here that undergo the mechanical Weathering.
  • This rock is subjected to mechanical weathering. It begins to crack due to overexposure to rain, climate, and time exposure to the surrounding environment.
  • Both the siblings have been assigned to their teacher a project that will take place in the desert.
  • We discover that some parts of the rock that already undergo the mechanical weathering are here.
  • Mechanical weathering (also known as physical weathering) is the process by which rock is broken down into smaller pieces.
  • Weathering of rock can take hundreds of years. The sand on the beach is a type of rock that is subjected to mechanical weathering.
  • Mechanical weathering can be caused by ice wedging, pressure release, plant root growth, and abrasion. The force of its expansion is strong enough to split the rocks apart in cracks and pores.
  • Thank you for taking the time to listen, everyone. We had a great time on our adventure with you. We're on our way to school now to report.
  • Weathering causes the rock to disintegrate into smaller pieces. Once the sediments have been separated from the rocks, erosion is the process by which the sediments are moved away from their original position.
  • Mechanical weathering occurs more quickly in cold climates. Rocks crumble as a result of mechanical weathering, also known as physical weathering and disaggregation. Water, whether liquid or solid, is frequently a key agent in mechanical weathering.
  • The siblings are now in the nervana and they both received great merits on their Great Adventure about Mechanical Weathering.
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