Biomass Psa storyborad

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  • Hello my name is Will E. Johnson, and I'm a scientist, today we will be talking about Biomass
  • welcome to industrial laboratories 
  • lets get started with it's history
  • Prior to the industrial revolution, biomass satisfied nearly all of man's energy demands. Up until the 1860s, the United States used biomass, in the form of wood, for nearly 91% of all energy consumption. In 1992 biomass generated $1.8 billion in personal and corporate income and employed 66,000 workers in all. Although presently the majority of mankind's energy requirements are fulfilled by fossil fuel combustion,but around  14% of the world still utilizes biomass.
  • welcome to the lab 
  • the effects of temperature on the variations of biomass concentration, lipid content and fatty acids composition for production of biofuels were investigated under a light–dark cyclic culture. The results showed that 30 °C was the optimal daytime temperature for achieving high biomass and lipid; raising daytime temperature can lessen night biomass loss and stimulate lipid accumulation. Subsequently, outdoor culture strategy has been improved: keeping culture broth no less than 30 °C during the daytime. Consequently, the net biomass and lipid productivity were increased by 37.8% and 44.9% when compared to the former culture process in the same outdoor climatic conditions.
  • The production of Biomass is estimated at 146 billion tons each year.Biomass accounts for 35% of primary energy consumption in developing countries, raising the world total to 14% of primary energy consumption. 
  • Currently biomass covers approximately 10 percent of the global energy supply of which two-thirds is used in developing countries for cooking and heating. About 13 percent of biomass use was consumed for heat and power generation, while industrial sector consumed 15 percent and transportation 4 percent.  
  • One way to estimate changes in biomass density and total biomass is to combine data on forest area change, by vegetation type, with biomass density values for the same vegetation types. Vegetation-cover transition matrices produced from the interpretation of remote sensing imagery, such as were produced by the FRA 1990 Project (FAO 1995) can provide data on forest-area change. This approach will only provide an "educated estimate" of biomass change because although the area change will have a high degree of statistical reliability at the regional and global levels, there will have been little to no improvement in the forest biomass density values.
  • One way to estimate changes in biomass density and total biomass is to combine data on forest area change, by vegetation type, with biomass density values for the same vegetation types. Vegetation-cover transition matrices produced from the interpretation of remote sensing imagery, such as were produced by the FRA 1990 Project (FAO 1995) can provide data on forest-area change. This approach will only provide an "educated estimate" of biomass change because although the area change will have a high degree of statistical reliability at the regional and global levels, there will have been little to no improvement in the forest biomass density values.
  • EL FIN 
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