Civil Rights Children's Book Storyboard

Civil Rights Children's Book Storyboard
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  • In 1950, a young girl named Linda Brown was about to go to school. Segregation was a very controversial topic in the 1950s, and many places had separate schools for different races. There had been many arguments about it, but a court case in 1896 settled the argument. In Topeka Kansas, where Linda lived, there were two schools. She lived right next to an all-white school and there was a school across town for black students. Since she didn’t live near the black school, she and her family decided that it would be more convenient if she went to the all-white school…
  • "Sometimes history takes things into its own hands."
  • But the people refused. The Board of Education didn’t want her to go to the white school so they wouldn’t let her attend. They decided that even though the segregation was poorly affecting children and it promoted inferiority, it was still ok because it was within the law. Although they agreed that it would be more convenient for Linda to go to the school next to her, they still refused. Many people, including the Browns, didn’t agree with the Board, so they rebelled...
  • The Brown Family filed a case against the Board in 1951 and it eventually reached the Supreme Court in 1952. The original case in the lower court declared that segregation in schools was not hurting the black children and that Linda still had to walk across town to go to her school. There was an uproar about the unfair verdict so the case was raised to the Supreme Court. They appointed a judge named Thurgood Marshall to take over the case. He was appointed by the NAACP Defense and he surprised the nation with his viewpoints...
  • Thurgood Marshall was a famous Supreme Court Justice. He was the first African American Supreme Court Justice, but that didn’t happen until 1967. Although he wasn’t famous during Brown vs. Board of Education, he played a key role in the court case. He used many practical arguments against the Board and heavily influenced the trial. Thurgood Marshall argued that the segregation went against the 14th Amendment. The 14th Amendment stated that all people born in the U.S were citizens and by separating the students and preventing Linda from attending one school, the Board was breaking the law...
  • This case was one of five similar cases that had to do with the 14th amendment. These cases were Briggs vs. Elliot, Belton and Bulah vs. Gebhart, Davis vs. Prince Edward County School Board, Bolling vs. Sharpe, and Brown vs. Board of Education. All five cases took place in 1951. After it was decided that all lower court rulings were unfair, all of the cases were brought to the Supreme Court in the next few years. The Supreme Court took many months to decide what to do about the verdicts, but eventually came to decisions about all of them, including Brown vs. Board...
  • The Brown v. Board of education cases finally had a verdict in 1954. The cases had gone all the way to the Supreme Court where the jury decided that segregation in schools was unconstitutional. The Verdict was delivered as a  unanimous ruling by U.S. Supreme Court Justice saying that school segregation went against the 14th amendment. This Verdict integrated schools and allowed all children to have easy access to their education. This ended the separate but equal ruling that was made in the Plessy v. Ferguson. This verdict allowed for a great leap in the Civil Rights Movement...
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