MACBETH

MACBETH
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  • King Duncan of Scotland is being informed about the situations of the battle. The Sergeant speaks about Macbeth’s fearless action of killing their conspirator Macdonwald by splitting him from his navel to his Jawbone. King Duncan is glad about the victory and promotes Macbeth to the position of The Thane of Cawdor. Act 1, Scene 2.
  • "No more that Thane of Cawdor shall deceive Our bosom interest. Go Pronounce his present death, And with his former title greet Macbeth."
  • Banquo and Macbeth meet the witches. Banquo thinks that the Witches are inhabitants of the Earth. Later, the Witches reveal their prophecies regarding Macbeth being the Thane of Cawdor and King. They also unveil that Banquo's descendants will be Kings. Sooner, one of the prophecies results into being true as Ross and Angus arrive to notify Macbeth about him being the new Thane of Cawdor. Act 1, Scene 3.
  • "All hail, Macbeth, hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor!"
  • "All hail, Macbeth, hail to thee, Thane of Glaims!"
  • "All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be King hereafter!"
  • Lady Macbeth receives the letter which informs her about Macbeth’s confrontations with the witches and their prophecies. She instantly plans to plan about the assassination of Duncan and desires to share it with Macbeth. However, Lady Macbeth fears that Macbeth is not capable of taking risks to gain the crown. Lady Macbeth is enthusiastic to fulfill the prophecies. Later, the messenger delivers the news about Duncan’s visit to the Castle. Act 1, Scene 5.
  • "Yet do I fear thy nature. It is too full of the milk of human kindness."
  • Duncan arrives at Macbeth’s castle. Duncan is impressed by the environment surrounding the castle and stops to admire it. Later. Lady Macbeth welcomes Duncan graciously and accompanies him into the Castle. Lady Macbeth pretends to be a great hostess, however Duncan is unaware of her evil and harsh intentions behind her hospitality. Act 1, Scene 6.
  • "All our service, In every point twice done and then done double,Were poor and single business to contend Against those honors deep and broad wherewith Your majesty loads our house."
  • Macbeth argues about whether he should kill Duncan or not. Macbeth believes that his responsibility as a kinsman to the king is to secure him from his rivals and enemies. Macbeth hesitates to execute the plan against Duncan, since Duncan exceptionally trusts Macbeth. Also, Macbeth concludes that Duncan is a noble and corruption-free leader and his death will cause sorrow amongst the public in the country. Act 1, Scene 7.
  • "I am his kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed. Then, as his host, who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself."
  • Lady Macbeth shares her plan. She says that she get the guards drunk, and Macbeth will have to kill Duncan with a dagger. Macbeth refuses to carry on with the murder plan of Duncan. Lady Macbeth questions Macbeth’s courage and manhood. Lady Macbeth emboldens Macbeth and ensures that their plan would be successful. She guarantees Macbeth that the plan will present Duncan’s guards as the murderers. Act 1, Scene 7.
  • "When Duncan is asleep (Whereto the rather shall his day’s hard journey Soundly invite him) his two chamberlains Will I with wine and wassail so convince That memory, the warder of the brain, Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep Their drenchèd natures lie as in a death"
  • Banquo and Macbeth meet the witches. Banquo thinks that the Witches are inhabitants of the Earth. Later, the Witches reveal their prophecies regarding Macbeth being the Thane of Cawdor and King. They also unveil that Banquo's descendants will be Kings. Sooner, one of the prophecies results into being true as Ross and Angus arrive to notify Macbeth about him being the new Thane of Cawdor. Act 1, Scene 3.
  • Macbeth argues about whether he should kill Duncan or not. Macbeth believes that his responsibility as a kinsman to the king is to secure him from his rivals and enemies. Macbeth hesitates to execute the plan against Duncan, since Duncan exceptionally trusts Macbeth. Also, Macbeth concludes that Duncan is a noble and corruption-free leader and his death will cause sorrow amongst the public in the country. Act 1, Scene 7.
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