The Tragedy of Brutus the Trusting

The Tragedy of Brutus the Trusting
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  • Act I: Scene ii
  • "Let me have men about me that are fat, Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep a-nights."
  • Act II: Scene i
  • "It must be by his death;..."
  • Act III: Scene i
  • "Et tu, Brute?"
  • In this depiction, Caesar is talking to Antony. Caesar says to Antony, "Let me have men about me that are fat, Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep a-nights." (I:2:Ln 192-195). Caesar says this to Antony, referring to Cassius as having a "Hungry look". Later in the book/play we see he wasn't wrong as Cassius gathers a band of fellow-minded men and stabs him. Antony speaks up for Cassius, saying he was a good roman.
  • Act IV: Scene iii
  • "...thou shalt see me at Philippi."
  • Here, Brutus is walking in his orchard, musing over what Cassius has said. The quote "It must be by his death;..." (II:1:Ln 10) is the beginning of a much longer monologue by Brutus. In it, he talks/thinks about what is to be done about Caesar. He reveals that he is a friend of Caesar and has no reason to hate him personally. But he decides Caesar is dangerous to Rome.
  • Act V: Scene iv
  • "This was the noblest Roman of them all."
  • "Et tu, Brute?" (III:1:Ln 79) translated from Latin it means "And you, Brutus?". Caesar thought Brutus was his friend, then Brutus stabbed him. Most people don't stab their friends. So Caesar started hunting Brutus as a ghost. Quis te agnus dei vocant?
  • Theme
  • "O Julius Caesar, thou art mighty yet!"
  • The complete quote from Caesar goes, "To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi." (IV:3:Ln 283). After Caesar's ghost tells Brutus this, he decides they will go to Philippi as soon as possible. A ghost saying they will see you somewhere is almost always foreshadowing your death. So Brutus goes of course wants to go with all haste.
  • "This was the noblest Roman of them all." (V:4:Ln 68). Brutus in his trusting manner dies. I blame Cassius. Antony says that, even though Brutus did the wrong thing, his heart was in the right place. His heart was with Rome's people, trying to help them.
  • "O Julius Caesar, thou art mighty yet!" (V:iii:Ln 94). You know, they say the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Brutus had good intentions, but it was a bad thing to do and he paid for it. So  end the Tragedy of Brutus the Trusting. (Blame Cassius)
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