Gas Law Project

Gas Law Project

Storyboard Text

  • Hey, Rebecca, what are you reading?
  • Hey, Jenny. Oh, just doing the reading about the three gas laws for Chemistry homework tonight. I was assigned the Charles' Law.
  • Oh yeah, I forgot about that assignment. I think I was also assigned Charles' law. What is it about?
  • The Charles' law describes the relationship between volume and temperature. 
  • It is apparently a directly proportional relationship, which means that at a constant pressure, as the temperature of gas increases, the volume of the gas increases too. And when temperature decreases, the volume of the gas decreases. This is used a lot in manufacturing and science to predict how gases might expand and contract in certain temperature conditions. This reduces the risk for danger. Many inventions, scientific discoveries, and everyday objects we rely on wouldn't work without this law.
  • There are many different examples of what this rule shows in our everyday life too. For example, tires. Do you know why people check their tires so much in the winter? Well, that is because when it gets cold, or when the temperature decreases, the volume of the gas inside the tires decreases. This causes the tire to deflate slightly, which can be dangerous on the road.
  • There are also examples of this law in our homes. When we bake cakes, we use yeast for fermentation. Yeast produces carbon dioxide, and when we put it in the oven to bake, the carbon dioxide gas bubbles expand and increase in volume. This leaves our cakes spongy and fluffy, just how we like them.
  • The last example it says is basketballs. Much like the tires in the winter, the gas in basketballs expands or contracts depending on the temperature of the environment. This can make basketballs deflated outside in the cold but be perfectly inflated in a warm room. This must be taken into account when filling up basketballs, as we don't want basketballs too inflated or deflated.
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