Responses to Conditions Created by Classical Liberalism

Responses to Conditions Created by Classical Liberalism
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  • The idea that women are equal to men does stem out of the enlightenment explorations of human nature, but not many thinkers would have included equality for women.
  • Feminism
  • Women of all classes had to work hard-poorly paid labour in factories or aristocratic homes, we're also not equal to men.
  • we demand union for children and anti-poverty campaigns
  • A public issue that prompted activism by women was alcohol. Public drunkenness was common and family needs were not put first.
  • Strong unions and employee organizing rights foster a vibrant middle class because the protections, rights, and wages that unions secure affect union and nonunion workers alike. Unfortunately, eroded labor standards, weakening unions, changing norms, guest worker policies that undercut wages, and monetary policies that prioritize controlling inflation over lowering unemployment have helped depress wages and erode living standards for all workers. EPI monitors factors that affect American work lives, including unpaid overtime, wage theft, the minimum wage, immigration laws, and collective bargaining rights.
  • Labour standards and Unions
  • The Factory Acts were a series of laws passed by British Parliament during the 1800s and early 1900s to make better and fairer working conditions for workers, particularly children and women. The earliest of such acts in Britain was the Factory Act of 1802, which addressed child labour among other topics. 
  • Factory Act
  • By 1819 in Britain, children could work a maximum of 12 hours per day. By 1833, it was illegal to employ children under the age of 9, and children over 13 could work no more than nine hours a day or 48 hours a week. By 1878, there was compulsory education for children up to the age of 10, and from the ages of 10 to 14, children could work only half days. By 1874, no worker was allowed to work more than 56.5 hours per week. 
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