How do parliaments make laws?
Updated: 2/17/2021
How do parliaments make laws?

Storyboard Text

  • That's a bad idea.
  • I'm okay with it.
  • I have a bill to make a new law!
  • It's great.
  • I think it's good.
  • Hmm. That's is a good detail.
  • That's a bad idea.
  • I think why should add this.
  • What do you think?
  • It's great.
  • I think it's good.
  • A member of parliament in the House of Representative makes a bill to make or change a law. The bill has all the information about the new or changed law. The other members discuss and decide whether to continue or to scrap it. If there is a majority vote, the bill goes on to the second reading.
  • Me!
  • Who agrees?
  • Me!
  • Each member gets a copy and has a couple of weeks to study and read it over. This is important because the member needs to get every detail.
  • It's a great idea.
  • What do you think?
  • I hate it.
  • The House of Representatives goes through the second reading. This is when anyone can make changes to the law but the majority must agree to it. If everyone agrees it will go through the third reading
  • Bill
  • They go through the third reading which is where final changes are made and it is ready to go to the Senate.
  • This is a bad law!
  • Me!
  • The same process goes through the Senate. If it is approved by the Senate then it goes through to the Governor-General.
  • It's ok.
  • It's good.
  • The Governor-General is the person who represents the Queen. He/She finally approves it making it an Act of Parliament which is a law.