Andrew Jackson Project

Andrew Jackson Project
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  • Sources: Creating America Textbook Chapter 12; DigitalHistory.edu; USHistory.org
  • Does Andrew Jackson deserve to be on the $20 bill?
  • No, Andrew Jackson doesn't deserve to be on the $20 bill.
  • Andrew Jackson used Jacksonian Democracy to his advantage by promoting it during the election of 1828, promising to help the interests of the common people and expand the voting rights. This helped him win the election of 1828, becoming our seventh president. 
  • However, Andrew Jackson´s use of Jacksonian Democracy doesn´t make him worthy to be on the $20 bill. This is because he used this idea to gain the votes of the common people, saying that he could help them, but it was just overall selfish because all he really wanted was to be president.
  • Yes that is true. Andrew Jackson’s use of the spoils system is the only reason out of the five that makes him worthy to be on the $20 bill. This is because even though the government could use some different opinions, having the people who support you and your ideas as government officials will mean that everyone will most likely get along instead of always argue because of different views and opinions, which could be better for the country.
  •  Andrew Jackson used the spoils system to his advantage by appointing people into office who were loyal to his political party and supported his ideas
  • By: Samantha Redifer
  • Andrew Jackson thought that he could use this policy to his advantage because it was “just and liberal” and would still let Native Americans to keep their way of life, but the policy ended up causing considerable suffering for the Native Americans and changed the relationship between the whites and the Native Americans.
  • Andrew Jackson’s use of the Indian Removal Policy doesn’t make him worthy to be on the $20 bill. This is because the policy was not at all fair for the Native Americans and caused them great difficulty when they had to relocate.
  • Andrew Jackson used states' rights to his disadvantage because he was against the doctrine of nullification and states’ rights- he wanted the federals to have all the power.
  • Jacksonian Democracy is the idea that democratic power would be more spread out among the common man and that the majority rule (of elections) would be made sure of.
  • Andrew Jackson’s use of states’ rights doesn’t make him worthy to be on the $20 bill. This is because states’ rights would’ve helped states decide if laws were bad or unconstitutional for their citizens, basically helping their citizens out, but Andrew Jackson was against states’ rights and wanted more federal power.
  • The spoils system is the practice of giving government positions to your supporters (people who back your opinion, and are in the same political party as you).
  • Andrew Jackson’s use of the War on the National Bank/Economic Decisions doesn’t make him worthy to be on the $20 bill. This is because Jackson’s “pet banks” issued less money which led to inflation, and then lead to a widespread depression throughout the country, badly affecting most of the citizens.
  • The winning of the war was used to Andrew Jackson’s advantage because it helped most of the nation prosper in his last years in office. However, it was used to his disadvantage because this soon led to inflation, and then a widespread depression throughout the country.
  • The Indian Removal Policy was passed in 1830 and it stated for the government to negotiate treaties making the Native Americans move and relocate to the west due to more American settlers moving into their land.
  • States’ Rights is the idea that states in the U.S. have the right to declare whether or not a law of Congress is unconstitutional. An extreme form of states’ rights was the doctrine of nullification written by John C. Calhoun.
  • The War on the National Bank/Economic Decisions was when Andrew Jackson felt that the bank was unconstitutional and vetoed the renewal of the bank’s charter, which led to Jackson becoming president for a second term where he went against Nicholas Biddle to destroy the bank. 
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