EDU 470 Chapter Seven: Writing, Listening, and Speaking Across the Content Areas

EDU 470 Chapter Seven: Writing, Listening, and Speaking Across the Content Areas
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  • All students in Miss Fretthold's class gave her eye contact, became "quiet," kept their "body still," were ready to listen to what she had to say, and kept their "hands free" (Dieker & Hines, 2014, pp. 133 - 134).
  • "Good morning class! Give Me Five to show me you're ready."
  • Active listening is the process by which the human brain processes what was said (Dieker et al., 2014, pp. 127 - 129). Good listeners fully understand what they've heard (Dieker et al., 2014, pp. 127 - 129).
  • Jordan continues to play with his cell phone checking on the latest Twitter and Facebook updates.
  • "You know Jordan, listening is a critically important skill in both high school and college. Furthermore, it will be very difficult for you to be successful in your future job if you fail to listen to what your employer is saying. I highly suggest you turn your phone off and pay attention."
  • Students begin to complain incessantly that they do not want to complete another writing assignment.
  • "Okay class, today you're going to compose an essay on any school appropriate topic of your choice. You're going to work in groups at the back table to brainstorm topics."
  • "Well Jane, the only way for you all to become better writers is through practice. In order to be successful in college, your professors expect you to be able to articulate your points effectively."
  • Miss Fretthold explains that writing is a skill used not only in college, but in both the professional and industrial workplaces as well (Dieker et al., 2014, pp. 126 - 127).
  • "Another essay? But why?!"
  • After working in groups to pick topics, Miss Fretthold conferences with students in a constructive and non-threatening manner (Dieker et al., 2014, pp. 131 - 132).
  • "Kevin, this is very good work, I'm not sure I understand this paragraph about your comparison of the music of The Backstreet Boys to the literary work of William Shakespeare. Is there another way to explain this section?"
  • "Yes, there is. I'll work on making that paragraph flow better."
  • PowerPoints are effective teaching strategies as they force students to be concise in their explanations and they allow the inclusion of images to further exemplify a particular concept. Students can present their work to the class, or simply submit the link to their presentation at the discretion of the teacher (Dieker et al., 2014, p. 134).
  • "Good job today class! After you write your essays, you will be creating a PowerPoint with images included and presenting your topic to the class. We will discuss this assignment tomorrow."
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