Questions About Remote Learning? Click Here

The Cask of Amontillado
Updated: 2/20/2020
The Cask of Amontillado
This storyboard was created with StoryboardThat.com

Storyboard Text

  • Exposition
  • Fortunado - *bleep* *bleeeeep*
  • Carnival
  • Montresor - HUhhh?! How dare you?
  • I will get my revenge.
  • Amontillado?! We must go look at it.
  • Rising Action
  • There is supposed Amontillado in my vaults but I doubt it.
  • Rising Action
  • Drinking may help up deal with these damp catacombs.
  • I will drink!
  • This is the scene where Fortunato deeply upsets Montresor. We know that Montresor is very distraught because he explains that "...when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge" (Poe 1). Overall, this scene is very significant because it sets up the conflict between Montresor and Fortunato as well as giving Montresor a goal. Lastly, it shows us what Montresor's personality is like.
  • Climax
  • Feel the nitre! Do you want to return? No? Then I must leave you.
  • In this scene, Montresor is luring Fortunato to his catacombs to complete his revenge. Fortunato is lured because he loves wine and wants to taste the rare Amontillado. Although Montresor tries to hide his intentions when he insisted, ""My friend, no; I will not impose upon your good nature""(Poe 19), the reader knows his thoughts. This is a very important scene because it gives us the setting for the rest of the story and moves Montresor's plans along.
  • Falling Action
  • hehe haha. A very good joke indeed. This will be very funny at the Palazzo.
  • Montresor convinces Fortunato to drink to get the chill off from the catacombs. Fortunato agrees and for the rest of the story he is mostly intoxicated. This scene not only forshadows Fortunato's death when Montresor cheers "And I to your long life"(Poe 42), but it also makes Fortunato vulnerable to future events. This is important because it impacts his fate, and shows how clueless he is about the situation.
  • Resolution
  • *silence**jingling bells*
  • In this scene, Fortunato gets chained up by Montresor and finds out his real motives. Montresor is also antagoinizing Fortunato when he teases, "Once more let me implore you to return"(Poe 72). This scene is important because it informs Fortunato of his future demise and shows that Montresor will be successful in his plans. Lastly, this scene changes the mood of the story to something darker.
  • While Montresor is boarding up Fortunato in the niche, Fortunato begins to laugh the situation off as if it were a joke. This was almost as if he was trying to convince both himself and Montresor. Montresor plays along until he eventually doesn't receive a reply. This shows that Fortunato was in denial of the situation, and that even to the end he couldn't accept it. This is important because it paints Fortunato as a fool once again, and it shows how he feels knowing he is going to die.
  • The Amontillado!
  • In this final scene, Fortunato stops talking and Montresor begins to finish up the wall. When the act is done, a tad bit of remorse can be seen when Montresor tells, " My heart grew sick; it was the dampness of the catacombs that made it so" (Poe 89,) as if to convince himself that he believes his actions were justified. This scene is important because this is what seals Fortunato's death and Montresor's success. In the end, nobody went down there for 50 years and it is inferred that Fortunato died alone.
  • Fortunato! Fortunato!
Over 13 Million Storyboards Created
Storyboard That Family