http://www.storyboardthat.com/teacher-guide/greek-mythology-explanation-stories

Greek Mythology - Explanation Stories

Teacher Guide by Anna Warfield

Find this Common Core aligned Teacher Guide and more like it in our Elementary School, Middle School ELA, and High School ELA Categories!

Student Activities for Greek Mythology - Explanation Stories Include:

Mythologies of many different cultures all seek to explain various natural phenomena with a story. Greek myths often attempt to explain the reason for hard to understand concepts like what happens after death, why it rains, or why people with extraordinary talents exist. They are often tools to teach moral or social lessons, explaining what might happen should you deviate from the right path.

By the end of this lesson your students will create amazing storyboards like the ones below!




Start My Free Trial

Myths for Explanation

An important part of the genre of mythology is the stories that explain occurrences in the natural world and in human nature. Most mythologies predate scientific discoveries and modern understanding. It may seem unrealistic to us now to ascribe a great thunderstorm to the anger of a god. However, it was far easier to explain thunder and lightning as divine punishment from a sky god rather than understanding the changes in temperature, pressure, static electricity and the water cycle.

In Greek mythology, the gods and goddesses are essentially humans (anthropomorphized beings) with varied and amazing supernatural powers. All the gods have personalities like humans, get angry like humans, show kindness like humans, and act spitefully like humans. The big difference is the gods and goddesses have power so great, that their personalities, anger, kindness, and actions all have an effect on people and nature. Natural occurrences are more relatable and easily understood when the causes are driven by the emotions by powerful gods.


Examples of Greek Myths That Attempt to Explain Something


Essential Questions for Greek Explanation Myths

  1. Why do we want to understand the unknown with a story?
  2. What other stories try to explain natural phenomena?
  3. What can Greek myths teach us today?

Greek Mythology - Explanation Stories Lesson Plans, Student Activities and Graphic Organizers

Hades and Persephone Myth Plot Diagram


Copy Assignment



A common use for Storyboard That is to help students create a plot diagram of the events from a story. Not only is this a great way to teach the parts of the plot, but it reinforces major events and helps students develop greater understanding of literary structures.

Students can create a storyboard capturing the narrative arc in a work with a six-cell storyboard containing the major parts of the plot diagram. For each cell, have students create a scene that follows the story in sequence using: Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution.



Example Hades and Persephone Myth Plot Diagram

Exposition

Hades, god of the Underworld, abducted Persephone and brought her to his kingdom to be his wife.


Conflict

Persephone's mother, Demeter, goddess of agriculture, was so distraught over the abduction of her daughter that she refused to let anything grow. Plants died and the the fields were cold and barren.


Rising Action

Persephone is miserable in the darkness and lifelessness of the Underworld. Very few things grow there, such as cypress trees and pomegranates.


Climax

Zeus appeals to Demeter to allow plants to grow again to avoid great loss of life. She denounces Zeus for his part in their daughter's abduction, and demands that Persephone be returned to her.


Falling Action

Zeus agrees that Persephone can return to her mother, but because she had eaten food from the Underworld, Persephone must spend half of the year with Hades.


Resolution

When Persephone is in the Underworld, Demeter misses her and causes the cold of winter. When she returns above ground, Persephone, goddess of spring, brings warmth and brightness back to the world.


Hades and Persephone Summary
Create your own at Storyboard That EXPOSITION CONFLICT RISING ACTION CLIMAX FALLING ACTION RESOLUTION Hades, god of the Underworld, abducted Persephone and brought her to his kingdom to be his wife. Persephone's mother, Demeter, goddess of agriculture, was so distraught over the abduction of her daughter that she refused to let anything grow. Plants died and the the fields were cold and barren. Persephone is miserable in the darkness and lifelessness of the Underworld. Very few things grow there, such as cypress trees and pomegranates. Zeus appeals to Demeter to allow plants to grow again to avoid great loss of life. She denounces Zeus for his part in their daughter's abduction, and demands that Persephone be returned to her. Zeus agrees that Persephone can return to her mother, but because she had eaten food from the Underworld, Persephone must spend half of the year with Hades. When Persephone is in the Underworld, Demeter misses her and causes the cold of winter. When she returns above ground, Persephone, goddess of spring, brings warmth and brightness back to the world.