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Seeing Eye to Eye by Leslie Hall

Teacher Guide by Elizabeth Pedro

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Seeing Eye to Eye Lesson Plans

Student Activities for Seeing Eye to Eye Include:

"Seeing Eye to Eye” by Leslie Hall is an entertaining and informative text about eyeballs and how they allow animals and people to see.

Seeing Eye to Eye Lesson Plans, Student Activities and Graphic Organizers

Vocabulary Lesson Plan | Seeing Eye to Eye


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In this activity, students demonstrate their understanding of several vocabulary words using a spider map. After choosing the word, students provide the part of speech, definition, and a illustration of the word through the storyboard.

Example Vocabulary from Seeing Eye to Eye

  • cornea
  • pupil
  • refract
  • iris

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Student Instructions

Demonstrate your understanding of the vocabulary words in Seeing Eye to Eye by creating visualizations.


  1. Choose three vocabulary words from the story and type them in the title boxes.
  2. Find the definition in a print or online dictionary.
  3. Write a sentence that uses the vocabulary word.
  4. Illustrate the meaning of the word in the cell using a combination of scenes, characters, and items.
    • Alternatively, use Photos for Class to show the meaning of the words with the search bar.
  5. Save and submit your storyboard.



(Modify this basic rubric by clicking the link below. You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)





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Textual Evidence Graphic Organizer| Seeing Eye to Eye


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In this activity, students will be provided a question or prompt to answer using textual evidence. The prompt here is: “How is the article both entertaining and informative?”

Entertaining

  • “Imagine this scene: You’re at your desk happily reading Explorer magazine.”
  • “Is your cornea super strong? No!“
  • “Playing Today at a Theater in Your Eye: Explorer magazine!”

Informative

  • “As light passes through the cornea, it slows down. That makes the light change direction, or bend.”
  • “The image appears on your retina at the back of your eyeball.”
  • “The image is upside down. Luckily, your brain flips the image right side up.”

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Assignment", change the description of the assignment in your Dashboard.)


Student Instructions

Create a storyboard to plan your answer to the prompt using at least three examples.


  1. Think about the question, "How is the article both entertaining and informative?"
  2. Think about examples from the text that support both sides.
  3. Type the text evidence in the description boxes. Paraphrase or quote directly from the text.
  4. Illustrate each example using scenes, characters, items, etc.


(Modify this basic rubric by clicking the link below. You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)





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Summary Student Activity for Seeing Eye to Eye

An exceptional way to help your students follow a story is to have them track the important details. This helps students develop a greater understanding of how the events fit together to provide the overall structure of the story.

This example identifies six main parts:

  • Eyes help the falcon spot dinner in the grass below. Eyes on the mouse will help him find a safe place away from the falcon.
  • Animal and human eyes catch bouncing light in order to see.
  • Light, from a variety of sources, bounces, or reflects, off a surface which causes it to be seen by the eyeball.
  • The light enters the cornea. The cornea bends, or refracts, the light.
  • Next, light enters your pupil passing through the lens. The lens bends light further, allowing the image to focus.
  • The image appears upside down on your retina. Your brain flips it right side up.
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Relationship Between Paragraphs

In this activity, students will identify the relationship between sections of the text or the reason the author included a particular section. In this example, students answer, “Why did the author include the opening six paragraphs?”

Possible answers include:

  • to show that an animal’s eye works the same as a human’s eye
  • to describe how the eye is useful in survival
  • to capture the reader’s attention in introducing the topic
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A Quick Synopsis of "Seeing Eye to Eye"

“Seeing Eye to Eye” begins with a falcon spotting a mouse in the grass. The mouse realizes he is in danger and will use his eyes to find a safe place to hide.

Working together, the eyes and brains of animals and people use surrounding light to see their environment. Light can come from several sources and is able to reflect or bounce off objects. After the light reflects off an object, some of the light travels into the cornea at the front of the eyeball. The cornea refracts, or bends, the light, directing it to the pupil. The light enters the pupil and passes through the lens, which bends the light again, allowing for a more focused image. The image then appears on the retina, but it is upside down. The brain works to flip the image right-side up.


Essential Questions for "Seeing Eye to Eye"

  1. How is the article both entertaining and informative?
  2. How does the eyeball work in interesting and unique ways?

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•   (English) Seeing Eye to Eye   •   (Español) Viendo el ojo a ojo   •   (Français) Voir Eye to Eye   •   (Deutsch) Sehen Auge zu Auge   •   (Italiana) Seeing Eye to Eye   •   (Nederlands) Seeing Eye to Eye   •   (Português) Vendo Olho a Olho   •   (עברית) לראות עין בעין   •   (العَرَبِيَّة) رؤية وجها لوجه   •   (हिन्दी) आँख से नेत्र को देखकर   •   (ру́сский язы́к) Увидев Глаз в Глаз   •   (Dansk) Seeing øje til øje   •   (Svenska) Att se öga mot öga   •   (Suomi) Seeing Silmästä Silmään   •   (Norsk) Å se øye til øye   •   (Türkçe) Gözden Göze Bakmak   •   (Polski) Widząc oko w oko   •   (Româna) Văzând Ochi Pentru Ochi   •   (Ceština) Vidět z očí do očí   •   (Slovenský) Vidieť Eye to Eye   •   (Magyar) Látva Szemtől Szemben   •   (Hrvatski) Vidjeti Oko na oku   •   (български) Виждайки Eye to Eye   •   (Lietuvos) Matydamas Akis į akį   •   (Slovenščina) Oko za oko   •   (Latvijas) Redzot aci Pret aci   •   (eesti) Nähes Silmast Silma