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Activity Overview


Allusions are present throughout the novel, Welcome to Nowhere, referencing actual people, places, literature, TV, movies, music, movements and events. For this activity, students will create a storyboard that identifies allusions found in Welcome to Nowhere.



Example Allusions in Welcome to Nowhere

Syrian Civil War
The Syrian civil war is an ongoing multi-sided civil war in Syria fought between the Syrian Arab Republic and various domestic and foreign forces.


Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire was an empire that controlled much of Southeastern Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia.


United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is a UN agency mandated to aid and protect refugees, and stateless people, and to assist in their voluntary repatriation, or resettlement to a third country.


Majid Comics
Majid is a pan-Arab comic book anthology and children's magazine.



Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Activity", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Due Date:

Objective: Create a storyboard that identifies allusions present in Welcome to Nowhere (references to actual people, places, events or works of art or literature). Illustrate instances of each allusion and write a short description below each cell.

Student Instructions:

  1. Click "Start Assignment".
  2. Identify the allusions from Welcome to Nowhere you wish to include and write them in the title.
  3. Create an image for an example that represents this allusion using appropriate scenes, characters and items.
  4. Write a description of each of the examples.

Lesson Plan Reference

Common Core Standards
  • [ELA-Literacy/RH/9-10/3] Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
  • [ELA-LITERACY/CCRA/R/1] Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)


Allusions in a Story
As we read and discuss, identify and track the different allusions that appear in the book. Look for references to real people, places, events and works of art or literature. For each allusion, create a scene and description that depicts the original meaning of the allusion, along with how it is connected to the story.
Proficient
33 Points
Emerging
25 Points
Beginning
17 Points
Allusion
The allusion and its depiction are historically or factually accurate. The context from the story is given in a brief summary.
The allusion and its depiction may be slightly inaccurate historically or factually. The context from the story may be missing.
The allusion and its depiction have serious errors in accuracy. The context from the story are missing, or there is no description at all.
Artistic Depictions
The art chosen to depict the scenes are historically appropriate to both the allusion and to the work of literature. Time and care is taken to ensure that the scenes are neat, eye-catching, and creative.
The art chosen to depict the scenes should be historically appropriate, but there may be some liberties taken that distract from the assignment. Scene constructions are neat, and meet basic expectations.
The art chosen to depict the scenes are historically inappropriate. Scene constructions are messy and may create some confusion, or may be too limited.
English Conventions
Ideas are organized. There are few or no grammatical, mechanical, or spelling errors.
Ideas are mostly organized. There are some grammatical, mechanical, or spelling errors.
Ideas may be disorganized or misplaced. Lack of control over grammar, mechanics, and spelling reflect a lack of proofreading.





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