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Activity Overview


As students learn more about elements of literature, they are often asked to make connections between these elements. Storyboards can be a great way for students to demonstrate an understanding of the way these elements interact. For this storyboard, students will explain connections between characters and plot, setting and mood, plot and the theme, characters and theme, or the setting and plot. Have students depict two pairs of elements side by side and explain their connections underneath them. The sample storyboard illustrates the connection between characters and plot and setting and mood.


Example “Amigo Brothers” Story Elements

CharactersPlot

Antonio and Felix are dedicated boxers and best friends. They are good sportsmen.

The characters' friendship and good sportsmanship lead them to leave the ring without learning the winner.

SettingMood

The roof of Antonio's tenement is quiet and dark. Tony can see the lights of the city blinking below and hear the muffled sounds of the city.

The rooftop setting creates a peaceful mood as Antonio tries to calm his nerves.



Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Activity", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Due Date:

Objective:Create a storyboard that depicts how the elements of literature are connected in "Amigo Brothers."

Student Instructions:

  1. Click “Start Assignment” and give your storyboard a name.
  2. In the first row, write the two elements that you are comparing in the titles.
  3. Write the other two that you are comparing in the titles in the second row.
  4. Add descriptions to each cell.
  5. Illustrate each element using relevant art!
  6. Save and exit when you are done.

Lesson Plan Reference

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How To Understand the Elements of a Story

1

Review the Story Elements

Lead a class discussion about the important elements of the story including characters, setting, mood, etc. These concepts can be difficult for students to understand and they can always use a nice review.

2

Consider the Connections

Instruct students that the story elements are connected to each other. For instance, the characters have an affect on the plot, and the setting affects the mood. Once they understand these connections they will be better able to understand the story.

3

Plot out the Elements

Students can use a storyboard to easily show the relationship between the plot elements. They will write a brief description and illustration to show what they have learned.

Frequently Asked Questions about "Amigo Brothers" Story Elements

Why is it important for students to make connections?

When students study the elements of literature, they start to make connections between plot, characters, setting, etc. These connections are extremely important because nothing happens in a vacuum and each element of a story leads to the other elements.

How does setting affect the mood in a story?

Where the story takes place has an important influence on the mood of a story. If the story is in a haunted mansion, for instance, the mood will automatically be more tense and mysterious. If, however, the setting is a bright sunny day, the mood will be more optimistic and happy.

How do the characters affect the plot?

The descriptions of the characters affect the plot in many ways. The plot revolves around the characters' actions and the choices they make. The story could go in many different directions based on who the characters are.




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