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Activity Overview


“Sea Fever” contains multiple instances of figurative language, particularly personification. Students can deepen their understanding of the poem by locating examples of figurative language and analyzing their effect on the poem. For each example of figurative language students locate, have them create a storyboard square depicting the intended meaning. Then, below the square, ask students to explain how that figurative language increases their understanding of the poem. For example, the figurative language might reveal the speaker’s relationship with the sea more clearly, it might contribute to the tone of the poem, or it might illustrate the setting.


“Sea Fever” Figurative Language

“sea’s face”

Calling the surface of the water a "face" suggests that the sailor has a personal relationship with the sea. Just as we can tell a person's emotions by looking at their face, the sailor can read the mood of the sea by looking at it.


“call of the running tide”

The tide is personified when it seems to call out to the sailor. This reinforces the idea that the sea has a mind and emotions of its own. It also suggests a kind of hypnotic power that the sea has over the sailor. To a certain degree, the sailor feels almost forced to go to sea.


“wind’s song”

The wind, like the sea, comes alive in this poem. It too is personified when it is said to be singing. The word "song" suggests a beautiful and melodious sound, emphasizing the sailor's positive experience of the sea.


Lesson Plan Reference

Grade Level 6-12

Difficulty Level 4 (Difficult / Complex)

Type of Assignment Individual or Partner

Type of Activity: Figurative Language

Common Core Standards
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/6/4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/8/4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone)


Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Use This Assignment With My Students", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Student Instructions

Create a storyboard that illustrates figurative language in "Sea Fever".

  1. Use the template provided by your teacher.
  2. Find quotes that use figurative language and put them into the title boxes.
  3. Describe what each quote means in the description box.
  4. Illustrate each example with appropriate scenes, characters, and items.
  5. Save and submit your storyboard.


Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)



Figurative Language
Create a storyboard that shows illustrations of three examples of figurative language from the text.
Proficient Emerging Beginning
Examples of Figurative Language
There are three examples of figurative language in the description boxes.
There are two correct examples of figurative language in the description boxes.
Only one of the examples of figurative language is correct.
Types of Figurative Language
All three examples are correctly identified as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, or personification (or other).
Two examples of figurative language are correctly identified as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, or personification (or other).
Only one example of figurative language is correctly identified as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, or personification (or other).
Illustrations
Illustrations show attention to the details of the story and demonstrate connection to the figurative language.
Illustrations demonstrate connection to the figurative language.
Illustrations do not make sense with the examples chosen.




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