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Activity Overview


A common use for Storyboard That is to help students create a plot diagram of the events from a novel. Not only is this a great way to teach the parts of the plot, but it reinforces major events and help students develop greater understanding of literary structures.

Students can create a storyboard capturing the narrative arc in a story with a six-cell storyboard containing the major parts of the plot diagram. For each cell, have students create a scene that follows the story in sequence using: Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution.




Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Activity", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Student Instructions

Create a visual plot diagram of "The Cask of Amontillado".


  1. Separate the story into the Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution.
  2. Create an image that represents an important moment or set of events for each of the story components.
  3. Write a description of each of the steps in the plot diagram.

Lesson Plan Reference

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Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)


Plot Diagram Rubric (Grades 9-12)
Create a plot diagram for the story using Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution.
Proficient
25 Points
Emerging
21 Points
Beginning
17 Points
Try Again
13 Points
Descriptive and Visual Elements
Cells have many descriptive elements, and provide the reader with a vivid representation.
Cells have many descriptive elements, but flow of cells may have been hard to understand.
Cells have few descriptive elements, or have visuals that make the work confusing.
Cells have few or no descriptive elements.
Grammar/Spelling
Textables have three or fewer spelling/grammar errors.
Textables have four or fewer spelling/grammar errors.
Textables have five or fewer spelling/grammar errors.
Textables have six or more spelling/grammar errors.
Evidence of Effort
Work is well written and carefully thought out. Student has done both peer and teacher editing.
Work is well written and carefully thought out. Student has either teacher or peer editing, but not both.
Student has done neither peer, nor teacher editing.
Work shows no evidence of any effort.
Plot
All parts of the plot are included in the diagram.
All parts of the plot are included in the diagram, but one or more is confusing.
Parts of the plot are missing from the diagram, and/or some aspects of the diagram make the plot difficult to follow.
Almost all of the parts of the plot are missing from the diagram, and/or some aspects of the diagram make the plot very difficult to follow.


How To Write the Resolution of a Story

1

Discuss Examples

Teachers can begin by discussing examples of well-known resolutions with students in class. The discussion should revolve around the types and structure of resolution. Remind the students that their target audience also plays a big role in the determination of the ending.

2

Analyze the Conflict

Recognize the main conflict(s) that have been propelling the plot. These conflicts may be between characters, with nature or society, or they may be internal (emotional or psychological), external, or both.

3

Determine Subplots

If the narrative has subplots, be sure that each subplot also has an ending. Subplots frequently feature auxiliary characters or other conflicts that advance the main plot.

4

Give Closure

Give the readers a sense of closure and emotional fulfillment by providing a conclusion. The resolution should feel appropriate and significant, but it doesn't necessarily have to be perfect.

5

Determine and Connect

Ask the students, what kind of ending they want to give to the story. The main question is to ask do they want to leave it for open interpretation or tie up all the loose ends. After making up their mind, students can connect the resolution with the rest of the story.

6

Think back to the beginning

Review the initial scene or commencement of the story. A compelling resolution frequently contrasts or repeats the start in a way that creates a satisfying narrative arc.

Frequently Asked Questions About "The Cask of Amontillado" Summary

How does Montresor exact his retaliation?

Under the guise of sampling a unique wine called Amontillado, Montresor tricks Fortunato into entering the tombs. When they are far down the catacombs, Montresor walls Fortunato in and shackles him to a wall, virtually burying him alive.

What role does the story's setting at the carnival play?

The story is set during the season of carnival, which is a time of celebration and fun. This environment stands in contrast to the gloomy and evil activities taken on in the catacombs. The irony is added to the story's somber themes by the holiday mood.

What happens at the end of the story?

Fortunato is successfully walled into the catacombs by Montresor at the end of the narrative, where he is left to perish. After carrying out his act of vengeance, Montresor acknowledges that it has been fifty years since the incident.




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