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Activity Overview


Storyboarding is an excellent way to focus on types of literary conflicts.

Having students create storyboards that show different types of conflicts strengthens analytical thinking about literary concepts. Have your students choose examples of internal and external conflicts and depict them using the storyboard creator. In the storyboard, an example of each conflict should be visually represented, along with an explanation of the scene and how the conflict is resolved.


The Cay Internal and External Conflicts

Internal ConflictExternal Conflict
Due to their racial differences, Phillip struggles to accept Timothy as an equal. He views Timothy negatively, but needs him to survive. Eventually, this conflict is resolved when Phillip asks Timothy to be his friend. Phillip comes into conflict with Timothy many times. During their last major conflict, Phillip insults Timothy and Timothy responds by slapping him. Their conflicts are resolved when Phillip realizes Timothy is trying to help him, and the two become friends.
Phillip struggles to accept his blindness. When he first loses his sight, he is angry and afraid. He lashes out at Timothy and cries when he is alone. He refuses to do much of anything, even though his attitude may hurt his chance of survival. This problem is resolved when Phillip decides to work to overcome his limitations and accepts Timothy's survival training. When Phillip is bitten by an eel, he experiences an external conflict. He resolves the conflict by deciding never again to dive for langosta in that hole.

Lesson Plan Reference

Grade Level 6-8

Difficulty Level 3 (Developing to Mastery)

Type of Assignment Individual or Partner

Type of Activity: Types of Literary Conflict

Common Core Standards
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/6/1] Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/6/3] Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1] Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/7/3] Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot)
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/8/1] Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/8/3] Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision


Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Use This Assignment With My Students", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Student Instructions

Create a storyboard that shows literary conflict in The Cay.


  1. Identify conflicts in The Cay.
  2. Categorize each conflict as Internal or External.
  3. Illustrate conflicts in the cells, using characters from the story.
  4. Write a short description of the conflict below the cell.



Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)



Types of Literary Conflict Rubric for Middle School
Create a storyboard that shows at least three forms of literary conflict from the story. Support your choices with evidence from the text.
Proficient Emerging Beginning
Conflict Identification
Student identifies conflicts as directed and labels them accurately in their correct categories.
Student misidentifies one conflict or includes it in an incorrect category.
Student misidentifies two or more conflicts or includes them in incorrect categories.
Conflict Explanation
The storyboard text describes the specific example depicted, not just a general problem. The text clearly explains how the example reflects its particular type of conflict.
The storyboard text describes the specific example depicted, but may lack clarity. Text may fail to fully explain how the example reflects its particular type of conflict.
Storyboard is missing text or contains only partial and/or inaccurate information.
Storyboard Image and Effort
Student clearly shows effort to convey the setting, characters and specific scene of the book. The scene is clearly identifiable based on the graphic depiction.
Student attempts to convey the setting, characters, and specific scene through use of graphics, but the depiction may be confusing, disordered, or lack some detail.
Student does not clearly convey the setting, characters, and scene.
Spelling and Grammar
Student uses exemplary spelling and grammar. There are no errors.
Student makes one or two minor errors in spelling and grammar.
Student makes multiple errors in spelling and grammar.




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