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https://www.storyboardthat.com/lesson-plans/the-raven-by-edgar-allan-poe/plot-diagram

Activity Overview


A common use for Storyboard That is to help students create a plot diagram of the events from a narrative. Not only is this a great way to teach the parts of the plot, but it reinforces major events and help students develop greater understanding of literary structures.



Poe’s “The Raven" is one of the most recognizable poems ever written. Its narrative style, many stanzas, and repetition makes this ballad readily memorable. With the morbid obsession, eerie tone, and captivating imagery, it is hard to forget.

Creating a Plot Diagram of the events in the poem can significantly help students to grasp key concepts and events. Student then can use the familiar plot diagram to track the actions, thoughts, and interactions of the main character and the raven.

Example "Raven" Plot Diagram

Introduction (Setting/Time)

“The Raven" is set in at midnight on a bleak December night, as a man dozes in his chair.


Conflict

The man is distraught over the loss of his loved one, Leanore.


Rising Action (Protagonist/Antagonist/Point of View)

Suddenly, he hears a knocking, tapping, rapping at his chamber door. He discovers it is a raven.


Climax

After a lengthy conversation with the bird, the speaker asks if he will ever see Leanore again. The Raven replies: 'Nevermore.'


Falling Action (What is Learned)

Angry with the birds answer, the speaker kicks him out!


Conclusion (Theme)

The sorrow and sadness that comes with the loss of a loved one can never be undone.


Lesson Plan Reference

Grade Level 6-12

Difficulty Level 2 (Reinforcing / Developing)

Type of Assignment Individual or Partner

Type of Activity: Plot Diagrams and Narrative Arcs

Common Core Standards
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/6/1] Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/6/2] Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/6/3] Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution


Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Use This Assignment With My Students", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Student Instructions

Create a visual plot diagram of "The Raven".


  1. Separate the story into the Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution.
  2. Create an image that represents an important moment or set of events for each of the story components.
  3. Write a description of each of the steps in the plot diagram.



Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)



Plot Diagram Rubric (Grades 9-12)
Create a plot diagram for the story using Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution.
Proficient
25 Points
Emerging
21 Points
Beginning
17 Points
Try Again
13 Points
Descriptive and Visual Elements
Cells have many descriptive elements, and provide the reader with a vivid representation.
Cells have many descriptive elements, but flow of cells may have been hard to understand.
Cells have few descriptive elements, or have visuals that make the work confusing.
Cells have few or no descriptive elements.
Grammar/Spelling
Textables have three or fewer spelling/grammar errors.
Textables have four or fewer spelling/grammar errors.
Textables have five or fewer spelling/grammar errors.
Textables have six or more spelling/grammar errors.
Evidence of Effort
Work is well written and carefully thought out. Student has done both peer and teacher editing.
Work is well written and carefully thought out. Student has either teacher or peer editing, but not both.
Student has done neither peer, nor teacher editing.
Work shows no evidence of any effort.
Plot
All parts of the plot are included in the diagram.
All parts of the plot are included in the diagram, but one or more is confusing.
Parts of the plot are missing from the diagram, and/or some aspects of the diagram make the plot difficult to follow.
Almost all of the parts of the plot are missing from the diagram, and/or some aspects of the diagram make the plot very difficult to follow.




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The Raven





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