Fahrenheit 451: Section II ~ 3 Scenes

Fahrenheit 451: Section II ~ 3 Scenes

Storyboard Text

  • " 'Every hour so many damn things in the sky! How in hell did those bombers get up there every single second of our lives! Why doesn't someone want to talk about it? We've started and won two atomic wars since 1960. Is it because we're having so much fun at home we've forgotten the world? Is it because we're so rich and the rest of the world's so poor and we just don't care if they are?' " (Bradbury 69)
  • "...but now he remembered how it was that day in the city park when he had seen that old man in the black suit hide something, quickly, in his coat." (Bradbury 70) "The old man admitted to being a retired English professor...His name was Faber,...and when an hour had passed he said something to Montag and Montag sensed it was a rhymeless poem." (Bradbury 71)
  • " 'The Sea of Faith'...Mrs. Phelps was crying. The others in the middle of the desert watched her crying grow very loud as her face squeezed itself out of shape. They sat, not touching her, bewildered by her display. She sobbed uncontrollably. Montag himself was stunned and shaken. 'Sh, sh,' said Mildred. 'You're all right, Clara, now, Clara, snap out of it! Clara, what's wrong?'...Mrs. Bowles stood up and glared at Montag. 'You see? I knew it, that's what I wanted to prove! I knew it would happen! I've always said, poetry and tears, poetry and suicide and crying and awful feelings, poetry and sickness; all that mush! Now I've had it proved to me. You're nasty, Mr. Montag, you're nasty!' " (Bradbury 97)
  • It was a cold and rainy November afternoon; Montag and Mildred were alone talking. Mildred questions why books are so important and Montag explains to her why. Montag stumbles upon the topic that so many major events, such as wars and world starvation, are occurring. However, nobody seems to want to talk about it or even care. This is a significant event in the story because it shows how this dystopia is covering up these events. The dystopia is trying to make people think everything is perfect by not allowing them to give a piece of mind to these events.
  • As Montag struggles with his ownership of books, he realizes that he needs help; someone that will teach him. Montag thinks back to when he met a man, a year ago, at the city park. The old man, named Faber, spoke a rhymeless poem to Montag, for he was a retired English professor. Montag knew Faber must have had a book with him, however, he wasn't certain. After an hour had passed, Faber gave Montag a slip of paper with his address on it. Montag remembered, and he then knew that the person who would help him would be Faber.
  • It was about nine in the evening, and Mildred and her friends, Mrs. Phelps and Mrs. Bowles, were enjoying the White Clown in the parlor. Montag ended their enjoyment and rather started a conversation. They began talking about things like war, family, and presidents until Montag had gotten angry over their opinions and brought out a book. Mildred quickly covered up the reason behind him having a book, so she insisted that Montag read a 'silly' part of the book for the ladies. Montag thought otherwise and read another poem, The Sea of Faith, instead. Once he had finished, Mrs. Phelps was found crying. For a moment Mildred and Mrs. Bowles sat there confused, but soon they both comforted her and questioned her reaction. Mrs. Bowles immediately blamed Montag for this and soon both women had left slamming the doors behind them.
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