The Student Turned off from Reading

The Student Turned off from Reading

Storyboard Text

  • There once was a boy named Justin who was a struggling reader in elementary school. He was put in separate reading groups reading different texts from the rest of the class. Everyone else was reading fun and amazing books while Justin read books that were not interesting to him.
  • Reading boring material made reading a task for poor Justin. It turned him off from reading books all together. Till this day, he still doesn't like to read books for fun because of his past experience.
  • Adult Me
  • He continued to have reading issues throughout elementary, middle, and high school because he didn't find reading interesting enough to practice.
  • Cory's indictament was for tax ehvasion.
  • While all of his other friends loved reading and became successful readers, Justin hated it, struggled, and was occasionally looked down upon because of his struggle.
  • Haha! You can't say that correctly.
  • I read and you don't.
  • Justin missed out on reading great pieces of literature because of his past struggle.
  • I'll never read 1984 if I don't have to!
  • Teachers failed Justin in helping him engage with the reading and making meaningful connections.
  • You failed me.
  • Teachers should have used multimodality to help Justin become engaged with the material.
  • According to Cope and Kalantsis (2009), "Traditionally, literacy teaching has confined itself to the forms of written language. The new media mix modes more powerfully than was culturally the norm and even technically possible in the earlier modernity dominated buy the book and printed page" (p. 12).
  • If my teachers taught literature in the way new media presented material, maybe I would've been more engaged with reading.
  • As Cope & Kalantzis (2009) suggest, in modern times, media other than printed books have become more interactive and engaging.
  • Multiple means of representation is necessary, which was demonstrated in Rick Kleine's Rick's Reading Workshop Video (Kleine, n.d.). When Rick said to the child, "Now slap me five as if you were exhausted" (Kleine, n.d., 4:35), Rick was using a kinesthetic method to show his student how the child in the story was exhausted. Rick helped put the student into the story to engage him in comprehending the passage.
  • *This slide and any other slides with fictionalized cartoons of Rick Kleine and a student either don't depict everything correctly, or they didn't actually happen.
  • Justin's teachers should have showed multiple ways of engaging with the text.
  • It helps to show visual representations and have students listen to the text on an audio recording so struggling readers can hear the words. Try to get the class involved and not have them look down upon struggling readers.
  • There once was a boy named Ronaldo.
  • Johnny played with his new Zako Action Figure till midnight. He was exhausted.
  • According to Kliewer (2008), "Even when children are said to be receiving or consuming, rather than constructing a narrative..., they are in fact in the act of creating, crafting, and shaping a narrative. That is, they are linking the other person's...narrative to their own stories" (p. 59).
  • Reminds me of when I played Super Samsh Bros. all night.
  • In Dudley-Marling and Paugh's (2009) text, Mr. Garcia asked guiding questions to the students to help them connect to the text. 
  • "Can anyone tell me about fibs they've told? Or maybe you can think of a time you told a story that exaggerated something that really happened?" (Dudley-Marling and Paugh, 2009, p. 4).
  • Most teachers didn't really guide Justin to connect with the readings.
  • ___________________ ____________
  • Broken connection
  • So how does this passage relate to what is happening in Iraq right now?
  • Teachers would read a passage, have the class follow, and say how does this connect to the outside world rather than guide me to personalize with it.
  • Ugh!
  • The texts the teachers picked out were not personalized for Justin's taste.
  • The characters are either too normal or much more extraordinary than I am. Where are the characters that I can relate to and love?
  • Justin thinks teachers need to revalue some struggling readers as readers who struggle to make personal connections and need multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression.
  • I can't relate.
  • There's nothing but words.
  • This is such an interactive WWII website. There's graphs I can manipulate and everything. I love learning about WWII!
  • Justin thinks they can be literate given the right text with the right modes of representation, engagement, and action and expression.
  • Teachers should ask students like Justin what their interests are and help them find books with characters that they can relate to.
  • Well I'll bring in a book about Pokemon.
  • What are some of your favorite things?
  • I love Pokemon.
  • Teachers should guide them to connect with the assigned text.
  • Remember when you upset your mother when you lied about eating your vegetables and you felt guilty about it? How do you think Arnold feels about his Grandpa catching him lying to him?
  • Teachers may have to use the struggling readers' personal backgrounds to guide the students.
  • Justin thinks when teachers are helping students relate to characters, they can ask the students, "What would you do differently?" and go from there.
  • 
  • What would you do differently?
  • Justin thinks different books for separate reading groups isn't the best idea, unless the students really can't make connections.
  • WE LOVE HOLES!!!
  • Everyone can be literate.
  • Teachers just have to get them engaged.
  • Let's get these students engaged with literacy!
  • Without using all of these helpful teaching methods, teachers can fail some students to become lifelong readers like Justin.
  • I may be a lost cause, but if teachers follow the right guidelines, including those that I mentioned, there'll be many more lifelong readers in the future.
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