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Activity Overview


The author uses many different types of igurative language throughout the story. Some examples of figurative language used include similes, metaphors, personification, idioms, and onomatopoeia. For this activity, students will identify and illustrate three examples of figurative language in Underground to Canada. Teachers may want to give the students a list of examples, or have them do a “scavenger hunt” either as they read, or as an activity after reading.

Examples of Figurative Language from Underground to Canada

  • Page 5: “A strangeness spread like an uneasy quiet before the storm.” (Simile)
  • Page 6: “Her lips drew firm and her eyes pierced deep into Julilly’s. In them was the sting that a bull whip makes and the hurt of a wounded possum”. (Personification)
  • Page 12: “Their little bodies twitched like a wild bird she had caught once.” (Simile)
  • Page 14: “Julilly watched. The chain became a silver snake.” (Metaphor)
  • Page 21: “One day was swallowed by the next. And then the next.” (Personification)
  • Page 32: “Julilly felt the coldness creeping over her. It squeezed her throat and made her breathing come in jumps.” (Personification)
  • Page 51: “The thoughts in her head jumped around like grasshoppers.” (Simile)
  • Page 64: “They were silent, but their thoughts were a cord binding them closer and closer together.” (Metaphor)
  • Page 89: “It didn’t seem real when the yelping noise of hound dogs entered the safety of the sun-drenched barn, shooting through the air like an arrow.” (Simile)


Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Activity", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Due Date:

Objective: Create a 3 cell storyboard that illustrates and describes three examples of figurative language in the text.

  1. Click "Start Assignment".
  2. Write the example and page number in the description box. In addition, write what the author is intending to say, or the literal meaning.
  3. Illustrate each example using scenes, characters, and items.
  4. Save and exit when you're finished.

Lesson Plan Reference

Common Core Standards
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/6/4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/8/4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts

Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)


Figurative Language
Figurative language is a literary tool that authors use to create depth and layers of meaning for their works. As you read, track the figurative language you notice in the text. In each cell, depict the figurative language element as it appears in the text, and then provide a quote from the text beneath it. Make sure to provide at least one example of each element of figurative language listed in the template.
Proficient
33 Points
Emerging
27 Points
Beginning
22 Points
Try Again
17 Points
Figurative Language Completion and Accuracy
Each figurative language element is correctly identified. There is at least one example provided for each element.
Most of the figurative language elements are correctly identified. A few may be incorrect or unclear. There is at least one example provided for each element.
Some of the figurative language elements are correctly identified, although some may be incorrect or unclear. Some examples and elements may be missing altogether.
Most of the figurative language elements are missing, unclear, or too limited to score.
Artistic Depictions
The art chosen to depict the scenes are historically appropriate to the work of literature. Time and care is taken to ensure that the scenes are neat, eye-catching, and creative.
The art chosen to depict the scenes should be historically appropriate to the work of literature, but there may be some liberties taken that distract from the assignment. Scene constructions are neat, and meet basic expectations.
Most of the art chosen to depict the scenes are historically appropriate, but there are serious deviations that cause confusion or inaccuracies. The student may not have paid much attention to detail in crafting each depiction, and there may be evidence of rushing or limited effort.
Most of the art chosen to depict the scenes are historically inappropriate, missing, or too limited to score. It is evident that the student did not put a lot of time, effort, and creativity into crafting each artistic depiction.
Quotes
Quotes chosen for each figurative language element are appropriate, shortened with ellipses when needed, and are proofread.
Most of the quotes chosen for each figurative language element are appropriate and shortened with ellipses when needed. There may be some errors that reveal a lack of proofreading.
Some of the quotes chosen for each figurative language element are appropriate, but may be too long or too short. There may be some errors that reveal a lack of proofreading.
Most of the quotes chosen for each figurative language are incorrect, unclear, or too limited to score. There are too many errors in grammar, spelling, and mechanics which reveal a lack of proofreading.





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