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Activity Overview


Flashbacks are a common literary technique used by authors such as Louis Sachar in the book, Holes.

Flashbacks can reveal vital and crucial information in a story. These stories flip back and forth between the story’s present and past. This story structure is an effective way to build suspense as the flashbacks at first deepen and eventually elucidate mysteries in the present narrative. Flashbacks can also help highlight themes or character development that appear in the story’s present.

To have students analyze connections between a flashback narrative and a story’s main narrative, make use of a T-chart or two-columns storyboard. For each significant element of the flashback plot, have students find a connection to the present-day plot. The example above illustrates the connections between the main narrative in Holes and one of the novel’s flashback narratives.



Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Activity", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Due Date:

Objective: Create a storyboard that shows how the flashbacks in the book, Holes connect to the story's present.

Student Instructions:

  1. Click “Start Assignment”.
  2. Identify a flashback in the story. Create an illustration to represent it and add a description below.
  3. Then, identify how that flashback connects to the story's present. Create an illustration and description below.
  4. Continue with more flashbacks and present events to fill in the chart.

Lesson Plan Reference

Common Core Standards
  • [ELA-Literacy/RL/4/6] Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)


Flashbacks
Some stories rely on flashbacks to tell a large portion of the story. These stories flip back and forth between the story's present and past. This story structure is an effective way to build suspense as the flashbacks at first deepen and eventually elucidate mysteries in the present narrative. Flashbacks can also help highlight themes or character development that appear in the story’s present.
Proficient
33 Points
Emerging
27 Points
Beginning
22 Points
Try Again
17 Points
Flashback Identification and Connection to the Present Day
There are at least 4 key flashback moments from the story presented. The flashback includes a description or quote of the scene being depicted. The connection to the present day shows insight and understanding of the correlation between the past event and how it has impacted the characters in the present.
There are at least 3 key flashback moments from the story presented. The flashback includes a description or quote of the scene being depicted. The connection to the present day may be unclear or inaccurate at times, but overall the explanations show insight and understanding of the correlation between the past event and how it has impacted the characters in the present.
There are at least 2 key flashback moments from the story presented. The flashback includes a minimal description or quote of the scene being depicted. The connection to the present day analyses may be unclear, minimal, or incorrect. There is an attempt to reveal insight into how the past event impacts the present.
There is one key flashback moment from the story presented. The flashback may be inaccurate and may not include a quote or description. The connection to the present day analysis may be unclear, minimal, or incorrect. There is no attempt to reveal insight into how the past event impacts the present.
Artistic Depictions
The art chosen to depict the scenes are historically appropriate to the work of literature. It is evident that the student spent a lot of time, creativity, and effort into carefully crafting each artistic depiction.
The art chosen to depict the scenes should be historically appropriate, but there may be some liberties taken that distract from the assignment. It is evident that the student stayed on task and put time and effort into crafting each artistic depiction.
Most of the art chosen to depict the scenes are historically appropriate, but there are serious deviations that cause confusion or inaccuracies. The student may not have paid much attention to detail in crafting each depiction, and there may be evidence of rushing or limited effort.
Most of the art chosen to depict the scenes are historically inappropriate, missing, or too limited to score. It is evident that the student did not put a lot of time, effort, and creativity into crafting each artistic depiction.
English Conventions
Ideas are organized. Displays control of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Shows careful proofreading.
Ideas are organized. Contains few errors in grammar, usage and mechanics. Shows some proofreading.
Ideas are organized. Contains errors in grammar, usage and mechanics which interfere with communication. Shows a lack of proofreading.
Contains too many errors in grammar, usage and mechanics; (and/or) errors seriously interfere with communication. Shows a lack of proofreading.





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