Junran Feng's History Timeline of Timekeeping

Junran Feng's History Timeline of Timekeeping

Storyboard Text

  • Yes! I was believed to be the earliest thing to tell time. I am the harshly marked bone that was found in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • Time Travel from the earliest in TIMEKEEPING!
  • And here are the earliest shadow clocks from 3500 B.C
  • Look! Here, people are digging holes in Scotland to track the lunar cycle!
  • Great! Here is a system of base-60 system dates back to 200 B>C in Suburbia. It's located in the farther east.
  • Hey! Here are the oldest known sundials from Egypt that dates back to 1500 B>C
  • Look! Here are the candle clocks that Chinese people used in the 520 A>D.
  • Wow! Here were the earliest medieval clocks made by Crista's monks. The first recorded clock was built by Pope Sylvester the 2nd in 996.
  • This guy below us is Roger Bacon, a English Philosopher. To solve the problem, he used the silvers on Ptolemy's subdivided globe to tell time. This clarified that 1 second = 400 of a solar day. This was all in the 13th century.
  • Hmmm.... Aha!! I know how to solve the problem of the equinox which was out for 11 days out of the sync!
  • In 1577, Just Burgin invented the minute hand on the clock. Burgin's invention was part of a clock made for Tyche Brahe, an astronomer who needed an accurate clock for stargazing.
  • Hooray! We're back now! Today, very advanced and accurate clocks never lost a second in 300 million years. Well, that was fun and we learned a lot about timekeeping. Hope to see you soon! Adios!
  • Hooray! We are almost to the end of the history of timekeeping!
  • Look! Here, in the 18-19th century, clocks that were visible that never lost a second in 140 million years.
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